Species Identification of Clinical Veillonella Isolates by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry and Evaluation of Their Antimicrobial Susceptibility
American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences
Volume 5, Issue 4, August 2017, Pages: 82-87
Received: Feb. 20, 2017; Accepted: Mar. 16, 2017; Published: Oct. 18, 2017
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Authors
Irina Ivanovna Shilnikova, Department of Health, N. N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center, 24 Kashirskoe Shosse, Moscow, Russian Federation
Irina Aleksandrovna Kluchnikova, Department of Health, N. N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center, 24 Kashirskoe Shosse, Moscow, Russian Federation
Inna Vasilyevna Tereshchenko, Department of Health, N. N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center, 24 Kashirskoe Shosse, Moscow, Russian Federation
Natalia Vladimirovna Dmitrieva, Department of Health, N. N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center, 24 Kashirskoe Shosse, Moscow, Russian Federation
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Abstract
We investigated the possibilities of the MALDI-TOF MS for species identification of anaerobic gram-negative cocci isolated from clinical specimens of cancer patients. A total 70 Veillonella clinical isolates and one Acidaminococcus intestini isolate were analysed by the Bruker Microflex MALDI-TOF instrument with the Biotyper 3, 0 software. All isolates were identified to the species level with a scores greater than 1.9. The most common species were V. parvula (37 strains), then followed by decreasing the frequency V. dispar (16), V. atypica (16) and V. denticariosi (1). Susceptibilities of the isolates were determined by the E-test methodology. All Veillonella isolates were susceptible to imipenem, whereas a high resistance rates were observed for penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanate and metronidazole. The proportion of intermediate/resistant isolates of V. parvula, V. dispar and V. atypica to penicillin (MIC ≥ 1 µg/ml) was 86%, 85% and 100%, respectively. The resistance to amoxicillin/clavulanate (MIC 16 - 32 µg/ml) was observed in about 28,6% V. parvula isolates, 23,1% V. dispar isolates and 6,7% V. atypica isolates. According to EUCAST criteria, resistance to metronidazole (MIC ≥ 8 µg/ml) of V. parvula, V. dispar and V. atypica was 88,6%, 53,8% and 40%, respectively.
Keywords
Veillonella Clinical Isolates, Anaerobic Infections, MALDI-TOF MS, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, Resistance Rates, Cancer Patients
To cite this article
Irina Ivanovna Shilnikova, Irina Aleksandrovna Kluchnikova, Inna Vasilyevna Tereshchenko, Natalia Vladimirovna Dmitrieva, Species Identification of Clinical Veillonella Isolates by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry and Evaluation of Their Antimicrobial Susceptibility, American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2017, pp. 82-87. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbls.20170504.16
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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