Reproductive Health Service Utilization and Associated Factors Among Female Adolescents in Kachabirra District, South Ethiopia: A Community Based Cross Sectional Study
American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences
Volume 5, Issue 5, October 2017, Pages: 103-112
Received: Jun. 6, 2017; Accepted: Jun. 19, 2017; Published: Oct. 20, 2017
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Authors
Teshale Tigistu Lejibo, Kachabirra District Health Office, SNNPRS, Ethiopia
Sahilu Assegid, Institute of Health, Faculty of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Muktar Beshir, Institute of Health, Faculty of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Tilahun Beyene Handiso, Institute of Health, Faculty of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Background: Adolescent girls are at the highest risk of maternal mortality compared to women in their twenties. Reproductive health service utilization among adolescent females is lower when compared with other age groups in Ethiopia. Objectives: The study was aimed to assess the reproductive health service utilization and associated factors among female adolescents of kachabirra district. Methods: Community based cross sectional study was conducted in Kachebirra district. A total of 844 female adolescents participated from 8 randomly selected kebeles (the smallest administrative unit). A pretested structured interview was used. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out to assess the association. Statistical significance was declared by 95% confidence interval of odds ratio. Results 812 female adolescents with response rate of 96.2% participated in the study. In this study, 383 (47.2%, 95% CI: 43.7-50.6%) of the female adolescents utilized the reproductive health services. Female adolescent reproductive health service utilization was significantly associated with; living with both parents (AOR=9.63, 95% CI: 1.237-74.983), age 15-19 years (AOR=3.295, 95% CI: 1.411-7.696), excellent attitudes of health providers (AOR=3.816, 95% CI: 1.561-9.324) and adequate consultation time (AOR=2.450, 95% CI: 1.178-5.094). Conclusions: There is low level of female adolescent reproductive health service utilization. Age, living arrangement, attitude of reproductive health service providers and consultation time in the nearby health facilities were significantly associated with female adolescent reproductive health service utilization.
Keywords
Female Adolescents, Reproductive Health, Service Utilization
To cite this article
Teshale Tigistu Lejibo, Sahilu Assegid, Muktar Beshir, Tilahun Beyene Handiso, Reproductive Health Service Utilization and Associated Factors Among Female Adolescents in Kachabirra District, South Ethiopia: A Community Based Cross Sectional Study, American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2017, pp. 103-112. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbls.20170505.14
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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