An Epidemiologic Study on Brucellosis in the Vicinity of Hohhot in China
American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences
Volume 6, Issue 3, June 2018, Pages: 63-68
Received: Aug. 9, 2018; Published: Aug. 13, 2018
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Authors
Xiaohui Wang, Department of Pharmacy, Affiliated Hospital of Inner Mongolian Medical University, Hohhot, P. R. China
Dexi Li, Department of Pharmacy, Affiliated Hospital of Inner Mongolian Medical University, Hohhot, P. R. China
Lidao Bao, Department of Pharmacy, Affiliated Hospital of Inner Mongolian Medical University, Hohhot, P. R. China
Ruilian Ma, Department of Pharmacy, Affiliated Hospital of Inner Mongolian Medical University, Hohhot, P. R. China
Sha Li, Department of Pharmacy, Affiliated Hospital of Inner Mongolian Medical University, Hohhot, P. R. China
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Abstract
In the past five years, the epidemic situation of brucellosis in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia, has been aggravated. The current diagnostic technology has low specificity. Through this topic, we can find a more convenient, safer, more specific and sensitive method for preparation. Better antigens are used for early rapid diagnosis of Brucellosis. Molecular biology techniques were used to design primers based on the published bp26 gene of Brucella from Gen-Bank. The DNA of Brucella isolates was extracted, PCR amplified and sequenced, and the bp26 gene sequence of the reference strain was identical to that of the reference strain. By comparing and analyzing the origins, the bp26 gene was amplified and compared with sheep, cattle, pigs, and sheep. In 2010, random surveys were conducted among 11401 people in 5331 farmers around Hohhot. The infection rate of Brucellosis was 3.82%, and 139059 of sheep were sampled in township and townships, and the positive rate was 2.82%. The results of bp26 gene sequence showed that the isolates of this experiment were 99.9% homologous to Brucella species 16M and Brucella species C68. The isolates were Brucella species 1320, Epididymis oryzae 280 and cattle. The homology of the Brucella strain S18 was 99.8%, 99.8%, and 98.9%, respectively. According to the phylogenetic tree analysis, the bp26 genes of Brucella strains of different strains are close, indicating that bp26 gene is very conservative. The homologous genes obtained by gene amplification technology can be used to detect br26 disease using bp26 protein. Other possible interferences can be ruled out and the diagnosis of Brucella can be promptly made. The culture and control of virulent strains of Brucella can be avoided. This experiment laid the foundation for the establishment of a new detection method using recombinant bp26 protein.
Keywords
Brucellosis, Early Diagnosis, bp26 Gene, PCR
To cite this article
Xiaohui Wang, Dexi Li, Lidao Bao, Ruilian Ma, Sha Li, An Epidemiologic Study on Brucellosis in the Vicinity of Hohhot in China, American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences. Vol. 6, No. 3, 2018, pp. 63-68. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbls.20180603.15
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