Differences of Facial Infection with Demodex spp. Between Indian Students and Native Students in Jiamusi University
American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences
Volume 6, Issue 4, August 2018, Pages: 73-77
Received: Jul. 4, 2018; Accepted: Aug. 21, 2018; Published: Sep. 19, 2018
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Authors
Huiming Zhang, Department of Parasitology, Basic Medical Science, Jiamusi University, Jiamusi, China
Sheng Bi, The First Affiliated Hospital, Jiamusi University, Jiamusi, China
Fangfang Wang, Department of Pathophysiology, Basic Medical Science, Jiamusi University, Jiamusi, China
Baocheng Zhang, Department of Ergology Laboratory, Basic Medical Science, Jiamusi University, Jiamusi, China
Juxiang Su, Department of Parasitology, Basic Medical Science, Jiamusi University, Jiamusi, China
Yue Dai, Department of Parasitology, Basic Medical Science, Jiamusi University, Jiamusi, China
Chunmin Wang, Department of Microbiology, Basic Medical Science, Jiamusi University, Jiamusi, China
Jiwei Du, Nursing department, Xiang’An Hospital, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China
Guang Chen, Department of Parasitology, Basic Medical Science, Jiamusi University, Jiamusi, China
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Abstract
Demodex is an ancient pathogen with is a contributor to chronic diseases such as acne rosacea or marginal blepharitis. Recently people found that many kind of diseases correlate with demodex infection, it begin to attract wide interest. At present, we want to evaluate the prevalence of facial infection with demodex spp, among international and local students in Jiamusi University of China. Using skin scraping method to obtain secretions, and then put the secretions to the drop of glycerol on a glass slide. The sample was covered with a cover glass and examined for parasites by light microscopy at 10× and 40× objective. Results showed that the infection rate in foreign students and local students were 15.2% (57/375) and 34.5% (203/588) respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between international students and local students in demodex infection rate (χ2 = 43.38, P < 0.05). There was a dominance of Demodex folliculorum infection in male of international students and local students, which are 63.6% (28/44) and 69.6% (94/135); followed by Demodex brevis infection, which are 22.7% (10/44) and 22.2% (30/135); last one is mixed infection, which are 13.6% (6/44) and 8.1% (11/135). Interesting, the infection rate of mixed demodex from local female students was the highest in total students. In addition, demodex infected local students with facial symptoms (67.9%) were significantly higher than those showing healthy facial skin (21.5%) (χ2 = 112.9, P < 0.05). Thus, one can conclude that the probability of Demodex infection is comparable for foreign students and local students unalike, which is related to examination methods, examination season, temperature, living environment, human race possibility.
Keywords
International Student, Local Student, Demodex, Infection, Face
To cite this article
Huiming Zhang, Sheng Bi, Fangfang Wang, Baocheng Zhang, Juxiang Su, Yue Dai, Chunmin Wang, Jiwei Du, Guang Chen, Differences of Facial Infection with Demodex spp. Between Indian Students and Native Students in Jiamusi University, American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences. Vol. 6, No. 4, 2018, pp. 73-77. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20180604.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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