Impact of Sorghum and Nabag (Ziziphusspina-Christi) Pulp Fruit Lactic Acid Bacteria Sourdoughs on Fermentation Properties of Dough, Quality and Shelf Life of Wheat Bread
American Journal of Health Research
Volume 4, Issue 2, March 2016, Pages: 30-38
Received: Mar. 19, 2016; Accepted: Mar. 24, 2016; Published: Mar. 31, 2016
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Authors
Emad Mohamed Ali Karrar, The State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, International Exchange and Cooperation Program, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, Jiangsu, PR China; Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, University of Gezira, Wad Medani, Sudan
Weining Huang, The State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, International Exchange and Cooperation Program, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, Jiangsu, PR China
Feng Wang, The State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, International Exchange and Cooperation Program, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, Jiangsu, PR China
Chun Li Jia, The State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, International Exchange and Cooperation Program, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, Jiangsu, PR China
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Abstract
Sourdoughs were produced from sorghum and nabag flour using Lactobacillus plantarum and L. brevis and added to a basic bread formulation (10% and 20% addition levels). Dough fermentation, quality and shelf life of wheat bread were examined. Acidification characteristics (pH and total titratable acidity), total bacteria count, fermentation end-products (malic acid, lactic acid, acetic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid and ethanol) and soluble carbohydrates (arabinose, galactose and glucose) contents were measured during both sorghum sourdough and nabag sourdough. Some differences between L. plantarum and L. brevis in acidification properties, fermentation end-products and soluble carbohydrates availability were observed both in sorghum sourdough and nabag sourdough. Addition of sorghum and nabag sourdough starters progressively decrease pH and increased TTA values compared to the control dough and bread. Addition of sorghum and nabag sourdough significantly decreased dough water absorption and increased maximum gas fermentation height, total gas volume, gas retention volume, thereby sorghum and nabag sourdough has positive effect to improve of the fermentation properties of dough. The results showed that dough prepared with 10% and 20% sorghum and nabag sourdough starters had a positive impact on bread quality properties, whereas nabag sourdough starters showed higher volume and moisture content and better textural properties during storage than samples of sorghum sourdough and control.
Keywords
Sorghum Sourdoughs, Nabag Sourdoughs, Lactic Acid Bacteria, Quality of Bread
To cite this article
Emad Mohamed Ali Karrar, Weining Huang, Feng Wang, Chun Li Jia, Impact of Sorghum and Nabag (Ziziphusspina-Christi) Pulp Fruit Lactic Acid Bacteria Sourdoughs on Fermentation Properties of Dough, Quality and Shelf Life of Wheat Bread, American Journal of Health Research. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2016, pp. 30-38. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20160402.13
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Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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