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Review of Facial Nerve Palsy at a Tertiary Hospital in Maiduguri, Nigeria
American Journal of Health Research
Volume 4, Issue 4, July 2016, Pages: 100-103
Received: Apr. 22, 2016; Accepted: May 6, 2016; Published: Jul. 6, 2016
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Authors
Maduagwu Stanley, Department of Physiotherapy, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Umeonwuka Chuka Ifeanyi, Department of Medical Rehabilitation, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Saidu Zuwera, Department of Medical Rehabilitation, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Oyeyemi Adetoyeje Yunus, Department of Medical Rehabilitation, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Dabkana Theophilus, Department of Orthopedics and Trauma, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Jaiyeola Olabode Abiodun, Department of Physiotherapy, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
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Abstract
Background: Facial nerve palsy is cosmetically distressing and functionally disabling, and may result from several causes, such as trauma, neoplasm, infections or genetics. Purpose: This study reviewed sociodemographic distributions, common types and causes of facial nerve palsy, and cases referred for Physiotherapy between January, 2003 and December, 2012 at a tertiary hospital in Maiduguri, Nigeria. Method: Retrospective study of facial nerve palsy was conducted at the tertiary hospital. Folders of patients diagnosed with facial nerve palsy and managed at the hospital were selected and reviewed using purposive sampling technique. Patients’ information was extracted from the folders and descriptive statistics was utilized to summarize the collected data. Results: A total of 48 folders of patients with facial nerve palsy from January 2003 to December 2012 were retrieved. Age range and mean age of the patients were 3-65 years and 31.02±12.3 years respectively. Age group of 23-32 years was in majority (37.5%) and male patients were more in number (64.6%) than the females. Lower motor neuron facial nerve palsy (56.2%) predominated over upper motor neuron type. Twenty (41.7%) cases were referred for physiotherapy. Conclusion: Although facial nerve palsy from our study is not common in this sub-region, awareness campaign is needed to enlighten the public about this ailing condition.
Keywords
Facial Nerve Palsy, Socio-demographic Distributions, Tertiary Hospital, Physiotherapy
To cite this article
Maduagwu Stanley, Umeonwuka Chuka Ifeanyi, Saidu Zuwera, Oyeyemi Adetoyeje Yunus, Dabkana Theophilus, Jaiyeola Olabode Abiodun, Review of Facial Nerve Palsy at a Tertiary Hospital in Maiduguri, Nigeria, American Journal of Health Research. Vol. 4, No. 4, 2016, pp. 100-103. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20160404.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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