Analysis of Hazards for Hepatitis B Virus, Across Departments and Occupations, Among Health Care Workers in Public Hospitals in White Nile State, Sudan, 2013
American Journal of Health Research
Volume 4, Issue 5, September 2016, Pages: 117-120
Received: Jul. 3, 2016; Accepted: Jul. 12, 2016; Published: Aug. 10, 2016
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Authors
Taha Ahmed Elmukashfi Elsheikh, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan
Abdelgadir Ali Bashir, Khartoum State Ministry of Health, Khartoum, Sudan
Siham Ahmed Balla, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan
Asma Abdelaal Abdalla, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan
Mawahib Ahmed Elawad Abu Elgasim, Khartoum State Ministry of Health, Khartoum, Sudan
Zeinab Swareldahab, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan
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Abstract
Background: Hepatitis B virus infection is a recognized occupational hazard for health care service providers. Aim: To determine hazard of HBV markers across department and occupation, among HCWs in public hospitals, White Nile State, Sudan. Methods: It was a cross sectional study, where 385 HCWs were selected randomly. Close ended questionnaire was used. From each respondent five ml venous blood was obtained, sera was separated and stored at-20° centigrade. Cross tabulation was performed together with Chi-square test. P value ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Result: Anti-HBcore: department of others (medicine, pediatrics, psychiatry, and ophthalmology) had got highest percentage (68.7%), followed by obs. (17.4%); the least was dentist (1.3%). Regarding occupation nurse got highest percentage (31.7%), followed by labor (27.8%); the least was pharmacist (2.6%). For HBsAg: department of others had got highest percentage of carrier rate (74.2%); followed by obs. (17.7%); the least was pharmacy (1.6%). For occupation, labor got highest percentage (27.4%), followed by nurse (25.8%); the least was pharmacist, nurse and midwife not nurse (1.6%). HBeAg: department of others had got highest percentage (72.4%); followed by obs. (20.7%); the least was surgery (6.9%). For occupation labor got highest percentage (34.5%), followed by doctor and Lab. technician (24.1%); the least was nurse-midwife, and operation assistant (3.5%). P value = 0.001. Conclusion: Statistically there was association between HBV infection and type of department and occupation. The most hazardous department was other (medicine, pediatrics, psychiatry, and ophthalmology). HBsAg and HBeAg were high among laborers as occupation.
Keywords
Hazard of HBV Markers, HCWs, Public Hospitals, White Nile State, Sudan
To cite this article
Taha Ahmed Elmukashfi Elsheikh, Abdelgadir Ali Bashir, Siham Ahmed Balla, Asma Abdelaal Abdalla, Mawahib Ahmed Elawad Abu Elgasim, Zeinab Swareldahab, Analysis of Hazards for Hepatitis B Virus, Across Departments and Occupations, Among Health Care Workers in Public Hospitals in White Nile State, Sudan, 2013, American Journal of Health Research. Vol. 4, No. 5, 2016, pp. 117-120. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20160405.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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