Prevalence of Diabetic Complications and Its Associated Factors Among Diabetes Mellitus Patients Attending Diabetes Mellitus Clinics; Institution Based Cross Sectional Study
American Journal of Health Research
Volume 5, Issue 2, March 2017, Pages: 38-43
Received: Aug. 2, 2016; Accepted: Feb. 22, 2017; Published: Mar. 9, 2017
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Authors
Kidist Reba Lebeta, Department of Nursing, College of Medicine and Health Science, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia
Zeleke Argaw, Department of Nursing, College of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Bizuayehu Walle Birhane, Department of Physiology, College of Medicine and Health Science, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Diabetes is a chronic disease, leading to many complications. Therefore the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence ofdiabetic complications and its associated factors. To provide evidence for this conjecture, Institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted. Samples were chosen by systematic sampling technique. Data were collected by pretested questionnaire and document review; data were entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 20. Among 344 type 2 diabetes patients, more than half (53.5%) of participants had major DM complications. Among major DM complications were diabetic retinopathy, diabetic foot ulcer and diabetic nephropathy with a prevalence of 25.5%, 21.2% and 11.4% respectively. In multiple logistic regressions Ages, duration of DM and drug regimen were significantly associated with DM complications. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus complication among the type 2 DM patient is high in study area. Therefore, the health care provider should strength early detection and treatment DM client.
Keywords
Diabetic Complications, Type 2 DM Clients, Amahara Regional State, Ethiopia
To cite this article
Kidist Reba Lebeta, Zeleke Argaw, Bizuayehu Walle Birhane, Prevalence of Diabetic Complications and Its Associated Factors Among Diabetes Mellitus Patients Attending Diabetes Mellitus Clinics; Institution Based Cross Sectional Study, American Journal of Health Research. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2017, pp. 38-43. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20170502.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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