Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Sexually Transmitted Infections (HIV, HBV and Syphilis) Among Pregnant Women Provided Health Care Services, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
American Journal of Health Research
Volume 5, Issue 5, September 2017, Pages: 154-161
Received: Aug. 30, 2017; Accepted: Sep. 13, 2017; Published: Oct. 13, 2017
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Authors
Kinfe Fissehatsion, Department of Laboratory, Addis Ababa City Administration Health Bureau, Gandhi Memorial Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Ibrahim Ali, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, School of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Ashebir Getachew, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Addis Ababa City Administration Health Bureau, Ghandi Memorial Hospital and Ethiopian Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Globally the burden of HIV, HBV and Syphilis infections are common problem of pregnant women where its complication isn’t only restricted to the pregnant women rather they are a serious issue for their newborn infants. Compared to developed country, developing countries including Ethiopia have been seriously influenced by such kinds of infections. Therefore this study have designed to determine the sero-prevalence and identify the possible risk factors of HIV, HBV and Syphilis infections in pregnant women providing health care services at Gandhi Memorial Hospital Addis Ababa, Ethiopia from January to April 2014. A Cross sectional study design has used and data on socio-demographic characteristics and possible risk factors have collected through pre-tested and structured questionnaire. After that blood have collected and screened for hepatitis B surface antigen using rapid cassette device and the final positive sample for HBsAg have confirmed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Antibodies to HIV-1/2 have tested based on the national testing algorism and Trepollema pallidum antibodies have tested by using Syphilis Rapid Test Strip (Quick Test™ Syphilis Serum/ Plasma/Whole Blood Strip). After the data have entered to Epi Info version 3.5.1 and exported to SPSS version 16 for validation and analysis, the overall prevalence of HIV-1/2 and HBsAg was 5.2%, 5% respectively while co-infection of HIV-HBV was 9.5% but no cases of Syphilis detected positive. In relation to the risk factors; history of sex with multiple sexual partners, pre-exposure to STI and low level of monthly income were significant risk factors for both HBV and HIV, while each infection found to have additional different risk factors; these includes: receiving of blood through donation, ear piercing and history of abortion for HBV infection while sharing different sharp materials and contact history with infected person for HIV infection alone. Therefore; intensified prevention activities in antenatal care targeting this population will have vital impact in halting the spread of the infections.
Keywords
HIV, HBsAg, Syphilis, Sero-prevalence, Risk Factors, Pregnant Women
To cite this article
Kinfe Fissehatsion, Ibrahim Ali, Ashebir Getachew, Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Sexually Transmitted Infections (HIV, HBV and Syphilis) Among Pregnant Women Provided Health Care Services, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, American Journal of Health Research. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2017, pp. 154-161. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20170505.17
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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