Developing an Augmentative and Alternative Communication System for a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Case Study
American Journal of Health Research
Volume 5, Issue 5, September 2017, Pages: 162-166
Received: May 10, 2017; Accepted: May 31, 2017; Published: Oct. 19, 2017
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Authors
Voniati Louiza, Department of Health Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy, European University Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus
Maria Christopoulou, Department of Health Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy, European University Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus
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Abstract
An area of great interest to speech and language therapists and educators, holding promise to support the individual with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), is that of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Oftentimes, the person with ASD cannot speak at all or struggle with language skills. The use of AAC is becoming widely accepted as beneficial for individuals with ASD. The current study aimed to develop the theoretical framework and the practice trends of AAC with ASD. The ways that the AAC is introduced to children with ASD, the promotion of a successful engagement with the AAC as a communication tool, and the development of a language system that sustains over time, were the attainable goals of the study. Furthermore, a relevant case study was presented. The case study demonstrated a classical presentation of a step by step development of AAC communication system, for a pre-school boy diagnosed with ASD. The ways that the AAC is introduced to children with ASD, the promotion of a successful engagement with the AAC as a communication tool and the development of a language system is not an easy case. However, it becomes widely accepted that AAC is beneficial and supportive for the individual with ASD as part of an intensive treatment approach to address communication needs.
Keywords
Autism Spectrum Disorder, Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Practice Trends, Case Study
To cite this article
Voniati Louiza, Maria Christopoulou, Developing an Augmentative and Alternative Communication System for a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Case Study, American Journal of Health Research. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2017, pp. 162-166. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20170505.18
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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