Interprofessionalism in the Literature: A Review of the American Journal of Health Research
American Journal of Health Research
Volume 4, Issue 2-1, March 2016, Pages: 44-47
Received: May 13, 2015; Accepted: Dec. 16, 2015; Published: Sep. 3, 2016
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Authors
Michael T. Kalkbrenner, Counseling & Human Services Department, College of Education, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, United States of America
Jewel Goodman Shepherd, School of Community and Environmental Health, College of Health Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, United States of America
Kaprea F. Johnson, Counseling & Human Services Department, College of Education, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, United States of America
Jill D. Choudhury, Counseling & Human Services Department, College of Education, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, United States of America
Alyssa Reiter, Counseling & Human Services Department, College of Education, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, United States of America
Alexandria Russell, College of Arts & Letters, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, United States of America
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Abstract
The purpose of this research brief was to review the available research on collaborative efforts to delivering healthcare in a health research journal. Interprofessional collaboration involves an interdisciplinary working relationship between health care providers to provide multifaceted treatment approaches to better serve clients, better educate students, and more effectively engage professionals. Interprofessional collaborations have been found to provide clients with a higher level of care. Communication about health related information among family members has also been found to promote higher levels of patient care. A search was conducted in the American Journal of Health Research (AJHR) using search terms related to interprofessional collaboration and familial collaboration. Findings indicated that there were benefits to collaborations among professionals and among family members. Results, however, yielded limited publications (n = 3) that were related to interprofessional and familial collaborations in AJHR. Recommendations for future research on interprofessional and familial collaborations are discussed in this research brief.
Keywords
Interprofessional Education, Interprofessional Collaboration, Health Services
To cite this article
Michael T. Kalkbrenner, Jewel Goodman Shepherd, Kaprea F. Johnson, Jill D. Choudhury, Alyssa Reiter, Alexandria Russell, Interprofessionalism in the Literature: A Review of the American Journal of Health Research, American Journal of Health Research. Special Issue: Interprofessional Education and Collaboration is a Call for Improvement Across the Board in the Health Sciences. Vol. 4, No. 2-1, 2016, pp. 44-47. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.s.2016040201.16
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