CRISIS Criteria for Effective Continuous Education in Traumatic Dental Injuries During Syrian Crisis
American Journal of Health Research
Volume 4, Issue 6-1, November 2016, Pages: 1-6
Received: Dec. 25, 2015; Accepted: Dec. 25, 2015; Published: Aug. 27, 2016
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Authors
Mayssoon Dashash, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Damascus University, Damascus, Syria; Centre for Measurement and Evaluation, Ministry of Higher Education, Damascus, Syria
Khaled Omar, Centre for Measurement and Evaluation, Ministry of Higher Education, Damascus, Syria; Department of artificial Intelligence, Faculty of Informatics Engineering, Damascus University, Damascus, Syria
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Abstract
The ongoing violence, accidents, and increased number of school leavers because of the current situation in Syria have increased the number of cases with traumatic dental injuries (TDI) with no or limited data estimating the exact prevalence of the problem. Delivering immediate and appropriate care might be a challenge for clinicians, and providing the best possible prognosis for the traumatized patient, might be far from optimal, if clinicians are not well prepared to provide the best possible solution. Online continuing education program can be a great approach during crisis to enable health providers to deal properly with TDI patients. A five week-long course that includes four modules which cover etiology, examination and diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of TDI, was designed. The paper presents the methodology and tools used to implement the TDI course in place. The application of CRISIS model including convenience, relevance, individualization, self-assessment, interest, speculation and systematic criteria was adopted. Pre-course assessment questionnaire was designed to rate the baseline knowledge about TDI and will be sent to registered participants through email. Likert type scale (from 0 = no knowledge to 3 = significant knowledge) were utilized. To assess the baseline knowledge and to measure improvement after reading educational materials of the course, a questionnaire with 40 identical questions was considered for pre-and post evaluation. Impressions towards type, duration, contents, and structure of TDI course will also be determined through post-course assessment with a five-response option (1 = strongly disagree, 2 = disagree, 3 = neither agree nor disagree, 4 = agree, 5 = strongly agree). It is hoped that the TDI course would educate health professionals to fulfill the responsibility of the current situation and would improve their skills to provide safe and quality care to patients with TDI.
Keywords
CRISIS Criteria, Traumatic Dental Injuries, Continuing Education, Online Dental Course, Syrian Crisis, Damascus University
To cite this article
Mayssoon Dashash, Khaled Omar, CRISIS Criteria for Effective Continuous Education in Traumatic Dental Injuries During Syrian Crisis, American Journal of Health Research. Special Issue: Medical Education in Emergency. Vol. 4, No. 6-1, 2016, pp. 1-6. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.s.2016040601.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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