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New Trends in Food Industry By-Products Management in Egypt
Agricultural and food industries in the Arab world represent a large proportion of waste was estimated at18.14 million tons per year and represent remnants of fruits and vegetables manufacture about 6.14% of this amount. Processing of fruits, vegetables, and oilseeds may results in high amounts of waste materials such as peels, seeds, stones and oilseed meals.
By Yousif Elhassaneen
Feb. 19, 2016


Food industry by-products

Yous if Elhassaneen, Sherif Ragab and Raghda Mashalin their new research paper titled “Improvement of Bioactive Compounds Content and Antioxidant Properties in Crackers with the Incorporation of Prickly Pear and Potato Peels Powder” look at the issue of food industry by-products in Egypt. Agricultural and food industries in the Arab world represent a large proportion of waste was estimated at18.14 million tons per year and represent remnants of fruits and vegetables manufacture about 6.14% of this amount. Processing of fruits, vegetables, and oilseeds may results in high amounts of waste materials such as peels, seeds, stones and oilseed meals.

Disposal of these materials usually represents a problem that is further aggravated by legal restrictions. Plant waste is prone to microbial spoilage; therefore, drying is necessary before further exploitation. The cost of drying, storage, and transport poses additional economical limitations to waste utilization.


Disposal of food industry by-products induced environmental pollution

Therefore, our paper aimed to analyze some food industry by-products including potatoes and prickly peach peels that constitute to waste for their nutraceutical values as food ingredient thus reducing its contribution to environmental pollution. Also, utilization of such by-products for their recovery of dietary fibers, bioactive compounds and antioxidants in the production of snacks such crackers was in the scope of this study.



Prickly pear peel (PPP) and potatoes peel (PP) were dehydrated under vacuum at 700C for 3 hrs to obtain prickly pear peel powder (PPPP) and potatoes peel powder (PPP) with 7% moisture content

Bioactive compounds analysis indicated that PPPP and PPP contains high levels of many valuable bioactive compounds/antioxidants such total phenolics, (421 and 1388 mg GAE.g-1DW) and carotenoids (217.11 and 135.76 mg.g-1 DW) as well as total dietary fiber (39.53 and 45.91 g.100g-1DW). The total dietary fiber, carotenoids and total phenolics content in crackers increased from 5.89, 3.01 and 110.23 to 8.11, 14.34 and 143.28 with 5% incorporation of PPPP and 8.74 g.100g-1, 7.88 mg.g-1 and 192.79 mg EGA.g-1 with 5% incorporation of PPP, respectively. Also, the antioxidant activity (AA) in control crackers was 30.11% which increased to 38.14 and 42.07% with the incorporation of PPPP and PPP by 5%, respectively. In conclusion, data of the present study revealed that food industry by-products can be good sources of valuable bioactive compounds and antioxidants subsequently extend their potential uses as natural antioxidants in nutritional and therapeutic applications. Synthetic food additive/antioxidants such as butylatedhydroxyanisole (BHA),butylatedhydroxytoluene (BHT)etc have been used as antioxidants since the beginning of the last century. Restrictions on the use of these compounds, however, are being imposed because of their toxicity/carcinogenicity. Thus, the interest in natural antioxidants and phyto-bioactive compounds has increased considerably.

Paper link:
http://www.sciencepublishinggroup.com/journal/paperinfo?journalid=153&doi=10.11648/j.ijnfs.20160501.18

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