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Possibility of Spinning The Aircraft Wheel at Approach
A puff of smoke appears from the main landing gear tires of heavy aircraft when they touch the runway. This is caused by the high slip between the stationary wheels and the runway. High slip causes a high temperature which burns off the eroded rubber; then the smoke occurs.
By Abdurrhman, A. Alroqi and Dr. Weiji Wang
Jun. 5, 2016

A puff of smoke appears from the main landing gear tires of heavy aircraft when they touch the runway. This is caused by the high slip between the stationary wheels and the runway. High slip causes a high temperature which burns off the eroded rubber; then the smoke occurs.

Since the invention of the airplane until now, many researchers have suggested spinning the aircraft wheel at approach, by means of a wind turbine, to avoid the landing smoke. Abdurrhman Alroqi and Dr. Weiji Wang modeled the aircraft wheel in ANSYS CFX to determine the required torque to spin the wheel. The wheel was tested against high wind speeds to be similar to real conditions when the aircraft is in approach phase. The minimum wind speed is equal to the aircraft approach speed in cases where the head wind speed is zero. The wheel was rotated to determine changes in the aerodynamic forces. These are the forces that act on the wheel during rotation; namely, the side and lift forces. Unfortunately, according to the wind direction, the lift force is downward which increases the load on the wheel. However, the main force was the equivalent of the inertial force, which depends on the acceleration speed.

The aircraft extends its landing gear at the final approach in sufficient time; and this is helpful in accelerating the wheel with a low acceleration. However, a Boeing 747-400 main wheel was the model used in this case study; and the required torque curve at different head wind speeds versus time is presented.

Required torque vs. time for different wind speeds.

Authors:
Abdurrhman, A. Alroqi and Dr. Weiji Wang, Department of Engineering and Design, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK

Paper link:
http://www.sciencepublishinggroup.com/journal/paperinfo?journalid=309&doi=10.11648/j.ajae.20160302.12

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