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Statistical Models can Give Good Estimation of Leaf Area from Measurements of Linear dimensions of the Leaf
As the understanding of plant growth and development has been increasing, mathematical models will be very useful tools for the prediction of leaf area for many plants without the use of expensive devices.
By Mikias Yeshitila, Matiwos Taye
Sep. 24, 2016

As the understanding of plant growth and development has been increasing, mathematical models will be very useful tools for the prediction of leaf area for many plants without the use of expensive devices.


Cabbage Leaf


AREA (cm2) = -260.27 + 27.115LW (cm2) [R2=0.97]

In a recent paper by authors Mikias & Matiwos, mathematical models are developed to estimate leaf area from simple non-destructive measurements in some most commonly cultivated vegetable crops’ accessions. Therefore, a modeling approach involving linear relationships between LA and one or more dimensions of the leaf (length and width) is an inexpensive, rapid, reliable, and nondestructive method for measuring LA and would be more advantageous than many of the destructive methods mentioned above which damage the plant canopy and might cause problems to other measurements or experiments.

The Authors used a standard method (LICOR LI-3000C) for measuring the actual areas of the leaves and evaluated the relationships as affected by leaf length and leaf width by fitting regression models with the multiple regression procedure using Softwares of SIGMAPLOT 10, EXCEL and SPSS.

Mikias and Matiwos also suggested, the equations produced should be validated with leaf samples taken from different environments and cultivars. The present models can be evaluated with leaf samples gathered from different growing periods and environments. In addition, care should be taken when using the produced models to predict the leaf areas of the plants in question to make certain that the leaf shapes are similar in form to those shown in this study.

Non-destructive estimation of plant leaf areas offers researchers reliable and inexpensive alternatives in horticultural experiments. Non-destructive leaf-area or plant-growth measurements are often desirable because continued use of the same plants over time can reduce variability in experiments as compared with destructive sampling. Additionally, the use of simple linear measurement for predicting the leaf area of horticultural plants eliminates the need for expensive leaf area meters. For these reasons, in the past development of mathematical models and equations from linear leaf measurements for predicting total or individual leaf-area has been shown to be very useful in studying plant growth and development. However, the accuracy of the predictions is dependent on the variation in leaf shape within genotypes (between accessions) and environmental factors. Because of this, there is a need to develop a good model for non-destructive leaf area estimation for genetically unique horticultural plants in the country.

Author:
Mikias Yeshitila, Matiwos Taye: Department of Plant and Horticultural Sciences, College of Agriculture, Hawassa University, Awassa, Ethiopia

A paper about the study appeared recently in Science Journal of Applied Mathematics and Statistics

Paper link:
http://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/html/10.11648.j.sjams.20160405.13.html

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