Coming Special Issue
Expiring Date:
Dec. 20, 2019
Submit a Manuscript
share
Special Issues
Expand the Popularity of Your Conference
Publish conference papers as a Special Issue
Send your Special Issue proposal to:
special.issues@sciencepublishinggroup.com
Submit Hot Topics
Submit
If you wish to order hard copies, please click here to know more information.
Home / Journals / Humanities and Social Sciences / Digital Media and Cultural Globalisation: the Fate cf African Value System
Digital Media and Cultural Globalisation: the Fate cf African Value System
Introduction
Scholars have long-debated whether digital media can directly change and transform social practices or whether such technology simply facilitate prior-existing desire and allows us to do what we want to do, but do it better. Some argue that the widespread use of a particular technology such as digital technology will drive a society in a particular direction. It is argued that digital technology can be used to encourage development and bring about societal-level transformation. However, if countries all over the world use the same technology, then they will gradually converge as the technologies shape them and they slowly lose their distinctiveness. Other scholars assert an opposing view that technologies do not drive societies or us individually. Rather technologies are developed, deployed and locally appropriated for specific intents and purposes that were present before the technology. We use technology to do our bidding and there is no inherent drive or logic that affects anything beyond its immediate use (Marcus, 2017). From this perspective, we are in charge and we deploy digital technologies to achieve our self-interests (at an individual or societal level). On the other hand, it is articulated in the literature that globalization is not just about the technological innovations used to communicate over long distances. In addition, and perhaps more importantly, it refers to the exchange and intermingling of cultures from different parts of the globe. The globalization of media especially, refers to the content of the cultural products available globally (Croteau and Hoynes, 2019). Therefore, going by the preceding arguments, the journal theme is informed by evidence from existing literature. These various ways highlighted the symbiosis of African core values of modesty, honesty, decency, respect, truth to mention a few fare in the face of digital media dominance. Apparently, this understanding is vital to engaging and dealing with some of the complex and extremely trying issues facing Africa in the 21st century and how those in power seek to address these issues. Indeed, the manner in which Africa faces the 21st century problems will be widely felt across the continent and world. Academic write-ups into this area will render understanding to these complex issues, the manner in which they are dealt with and the myriad of ways in which digital media is being used to advance the interest of Africans and the wider world. Therefore, the position of this theme is that technologies are developed, deployed and locally appropriated for specific intents and purposes that were present before the technology because what people do with the technology will determine the core values of the African culture and since this theme is not properly addressed in other journals, it becomes a point of departure to bridge the gap. Aims and Scope: Digital Media African Value System Globalization Media and Culture New Media Imperialism Social Change Critical Heritage Studies Environmental Humanities Community Economy Cultural Diversity
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186