American Journal of Health Research

| Peer-Reviewed |

Nutrition Education Influences Child Feeding Knowledge Attitudes and Practices of Caregivers in Uganda

Received: 24 February 2015    Accepted: 7 March 2015    Published: 16 March 2015
Views:       Downloads:

Share This Article

Abstract

A Cross-sectional sample of households that were involved in farming of orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) and had 2–6 year old children were purposively selected from four divisions of Kampala Capital City Authority (Kawempe, Rubaga, Makindye and Nakawa) to participate in a controlled, cohort intervention. Respondents in Kawempe division had received training in production of OFSP and nutrition education; in Rubaga division respondents had only training in production of OFSP; in Nakawa division they only had nutrition education while in Makindye division the respondents did not training in nutrition education and production of OFSP and thus served as the control. A total of 457 households were involved in the study and a coded questionnaire was used to collect data on caregiver’s knowledge, attitudes and practices of child nutrition after the 12 month intervention. Chi-square tests were used to test for significant relationships (p≤0.05) amongst variables of interest. Results of the study show that majority of the children (2-6 years) take their meals from that of the family. At least 20% of the respondents serve lunch and dinner separately for the child with no significant differences among the divisions. Thus any major nutritional interventions should target the caregivers’ knowledge, attitudes and practices of child feeding and the first meal the child takes. On preparation of meat, 71% of the respondents who received nutrition education gave correct advice compared to 28% who did not receive the intervention. With regard to Maize porridge and beans preparation, significant differences could not be attributed to the intervention. However, 40% of the respondents in Nakawa and Makindye gave advice that was not helpful and so could not be adequately followed in the correct preparation of maize porridge and beans for the children. Preparation of kitoobero, a highly nutritious complementary dish for weaning children, was taught during the nutrition education sessions. Significantly more respondents who received nutrition education identified at least two combinations of foods used for kitoobero (65%) compared to about 5% of those who did not receive the intervention. The study found that majority of the respondents, 65% and 80% respectively in Kawempe and Rubaga compared to over 85% in Nakawa and Makindye had not prepared kitoobero seven days prior to the study. The results show that nutrition education significantly impacts on knowledge of meal preparation for weaning children, attitudes, and practices of child feeding. It is recommended that nutrition education as a strategy of improving child feeding knowledge and practices should be taken up by the public health sector so as to boost the fight against malnutrition which is a major problem in Uganda.

DOI 10.11648/j.ajhr.20150302.15
Published in American Journal of Health Research (Volume 3, Issue 2, March 2015)
Page(s) 82-90
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Nutrition Education, Child Feeding Practices, Caregivers, Malnutrition

References
[1] WHO. Guiding principles for complementary feeding of the breastfed child. 2003. http://whqlibdoc.who.int/paho/2003/a85622.pdf?ua=1
[2] Ruel MT, Menon P. Child feeding practices are associated with child nutritional status in Latin America: innovative uses of the demographic and health surveys. J Nutr. 2002; 132(6):1180-1187.
[3] Black MM, Dubowitz H, Hutcheson J, Berenson-Howard J, Starr RH Jr. A Randomized clinical trial of home intervention for children with failure to thrive. Pediatrics. 1995; 95:807-814.
[4] Agarwal DK, Awasthy A, Upadhyay SK, Singh P, Kumar J, Agarwal KN. Growth, behavior, development and intelligence in rural children between 1-3 years of life. Indian Pediatr. 1992; 29:467-480.
[5] UNICEF/UNU/WHO/MI Technical Workshop. Preventing iron deficiency in women and children: technical consensus on key issues. Boston, MA: International Nutrition Foundation, 1999.
[6] Bhandari N, Mazumder S, Bahl R, Martines J, Black RE, Bhan MK, Infant Feeding Study Group. An educational intervention to promote appropriate complementary feeding practices and physical growth in infants and young children in rural Haryana, India. J Nutr. 2004; 134(9):2342-2348.
[7] Lutter CK, Daelmans BM, de Onis M, Kothari MT, Ruel MT, Arimond M, Deitchler M, Dewey KG, Blössner M, Borghi E. Undernutrition, poor feeding practices, and low coverage of key nutrition interventions. Pediatrics. 2011; 128(6):e1418-27.
[8] Dewey KG, Cohen RJ, Brown KH, Rivera LL. Age of introduction of complementary food and growth of term, low birth weight breastfed infants: a randomized intervention study in Honduras. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999; 69:679-686.
[9] Kulwa KBM, Verstraeten R, Bouckaert K, Mamiro P, Kolsteren P, Lachat C. Effectiveness of a nutrition education package in improving feeding practices, dietary adequacy and growth of infants and young children in rural Tanzania: rationale, design and methods of a cluster randomised trial. BMC Public Health 2014; 14:1077.
[10] Latham MS, Kinoti LS. Improvements in Growth following Iron Supplementation in Young Kenyan School Children. Nutrition. 1990; 6:159-165.
[11] Penny ME, Creed-Kanashiro HM, Robert RC, Narro MR, Caulfield LE, Black RE. Effectiveness of an educational intervention delivered through the health services to improve nutrition in young children: a cluster-randomised controlled trial. Lancet. 2005; 365(9474):1863-1872.
[12] Kuriyan R, Kurpad AV. Complementary feeding patterns in India. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2012; 22(10):799-805.
[13] Lawan UM, Amole GT, Jahum MG, Sani A. Age-appropriate feeding practices and nutritional status of infants attending child welfare clinic at a Teaching Hospital in Nigeria. J Family Community Med. 2014; 21(1):6-12.
[14] Uganda Bureau of Statistics (UBOS) and Macro International Inc. 2012. Uganda Demographic and Health Survey 2011. Pages 9.
[15] Wamani H, Astrøm AN, Peterson S, Tylleskär T, Tumwine JK. Infant and young child feeding in western Uganda: knowledge, practices and socio-economic correlates. J Trop Pediatr. 2005; 51(6):356-361.
[16] Kulwa KB, Kinabo JL, Modest B. Constraints on good child-care practices and nutritional status in urban Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. Food Nutr Bull. 2006; 27(3):236-244.
[17] Webb P, Block S. Nutrition knowledge and parental schooling as inputs to child nutrition in the long and short run. Nutrition Working Paper No. 3. BAPPENAS/DEPARTMEN PERTANIAN/USAID/DAI FOOD POLICY ADVISORY TEAM. 2003. http://pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/Pnade922.pdf.
[18] Salehi M, Kimiagar SM, Shahbazi M, Mehrabi Y, Kolahi AA. Assessing the impact of nutrition education on growth indices of Iranian nomadic children: an application of a modified beliefs, attitudes, subjective-norms and enabling-factors model. Br J Nutr. 2004; 91(5):779-787.
[19] Bezner Kerr R, Berti PR, Shumba L. Effects of a participatory agriculture and nutrition education project on child growth in northern Malawi. Public Health Nutr. 2011; 14(8):1466-1472.
[20] Shi L, Zhang J. Recent evidence of the effectiveness of educational interventions for improving complementary feeding practices in developing countries. J Trop Pediatr. 2011; 57(2):91-98.
[21] Guldan GS, Fan HC, Ma X, Ni ZZ, Xiang X, Tang MZ. Culturally Appropriate Nutrition Education Improves Infant Feeding and Growth in Rural Sichuan, China. J Nutr. 2000;130(5):1204-1211.
[22] Paul KH, Muti M, Chasekwa B, Mbuya MN, Madzima RC, Humphrey JH, Stoltzfus RJ. Complementary feeding messages that target cultural barriers enhance both the use of lipid-based nutrient supplements and underlying feeding practices to improve infant diets in rural Zimbabwe. Matern Child Nutr. 2012; 8(2):225-238.
[23] Hotz C, Gibson RS. Participatory nutrition education and adoption of new feeding practices are associated with improved adequacy of complementary diets among rural Malawian children: a pilot study. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005; 59(2):226-237.
[24] Kilaru A, Griffiths PL, Ganapathy S, Ghosh S. Community-based nutrition education for improving infant growth in rural Karnataka. Indian Pediatr. 2005; 42(5):425-432.
[25] Roy SK, Fuchs GJ, Mahmud Z, Ara G, Islam S, Shafique S, Akter SS, Chakraborty B. Intensive nutrition education with or without supplementary feeding improves the nutritional status of moderately-malnourished children in Bangladesh. J Health Popul Nutr. 2005; 23(4):320-330.
[26] Santos I, Victora CG, Martines J, Gonçalves H, Gigante DP, Valle NJ, Pelto G. Nutrition counseling increases weight gain among Brazilian children. J Nutr. 2001; 131(11):2866-2873.
[27] Aboud FE, Moore AC, Akhter S. Effectiveness of a community-based responsive feeding programme in rural Bangladesh: a cluster randomized field trial. Matern Child Nutr. 2008; 4(4):275-286.
[28] Kirkwood RB. 1988. Essential Medical Statistics. 2nd ed. Blackwell Scientific Publications. Oxford, London Edinburgh. 197p.
[29] Uganda Bureau of Statistics (UBOS) and Macro International Inc. 2007. Vitamin Addendum to Uganda Demographic and Health Survey 2006.
Cite This Article
  • APA Style

    Josephine Nabugoomu, Agnes Namutebi, Archileo N. Kaaya, George Nasinyama. (2015). Nutrition Education Influences Child Feeding Knowledge Attitudes and Practices of Caregivers in Uganda. American Journal of Health Research, 3(2), 82-90. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajhr.20150302.15

    Copy | Download

    ACS Style

    Josephine Nabugoomu; Agnes Namutebi; Archileo N. Kaaya; George Nasinyama. Nutrition Education Influences Child Feeding Knowledge Attitudes and Practices of Caregivers in Uganda. Am. J. Health Res. 2015, 3(2), 82-90. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20150302.15

    Copy | Download

    AMA Style

    Josephine Nabugoomu, Agnes Namutebi, Archileo N. Kaaya, George Nasinyama. Nutrition Education Influences Child Feeding Knowledge Attitudes and Practices of Caregivers in Uganda. Am J Health Res. 2015;3(2):82-90. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20150302.15

    Copy | Download

  • @article{10.11648/j.ajhr.20150302.15,
      author = {Josephine Nabugoomu and Agnes Namutebi and Archileo N. Kaaya and George Nasinyama},
      title = {Nutrition Education Influences Child Feeding Knowledge Attitudes and Practices of Caregivers in Uganda},
      journal = {American Journal of Health Research},
      volume = {3},
      number = {2},
      pages = {82-90},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ajhr.20150302.15},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajhr.20150302.15},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ajhr.20150302.15},
      abstract = {A Cross-sectional sample of households that were involved in farming of orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) and had 2–6 year old children were purposively selected from four divisions of Kampala Capital City Authority (Kawempe, Rubaga, Makindye and Nakawa) to participate in a controlled, cohort intervention. Respondents in Kawempe division had received training in production of OFSP and nutrition education; in Rubaga division respondents had only training in production of OFSP; in Nakawa division they only had nutrition education while in Makindye division the respondents did not training in nutrition education and production of OFSP and thus served as the control. A total of 457 households were involved in the study and a coded questionnaire was used to collect data on caregiver’s knowledge, attitudes and practices of child nutrition after the 12 month intervention. Chi-square tests were used to test for significant relationships (p≤0.05) amongst variables of interest. Results of the study show that majority of the children (2-6 years) take their meals from that of the family. At least 20% of the respondents serve lunch and dinner separately for the child with no significant differences among the divisions. Thus any major nutritional interventions should target the caregivers’ knowledge, attitudes and practices of child feeding and the first meal the child takes. On preparation of meat, 71% of the respondents who received nutrition education gave correct advice compared to 28% who did not receive the intervention. With regard to Maize porridge and beans preparation, significant differences could not be attributed to the intervention. However, 40% of the respondents in Nakawa and Makindye gave advice that was not helpful and so could not be adequately followed in the correct preparation of maize porridge and beans for the children. Preparation of kitoobero, a highly nutritious complementary dish for weaning children, was taught during the nutrition education sessions. Significantly more respondents who received nutrition education identified at least two combinations of foods used for kitoobero (65%) compared to about 5% of those who did not receive the intervention. The study found that majority of the respondents, 65% and 80% respectively in Kawempe and Rubaga compared to over 85% in Nakawa and Makindye had not prepared kitoobero seven days prior to the study. The results show that nutrition education significantly impacts on knowledge of meal preparation for weaning children, attitudes, and practices of child feeding. It is recommended that nutrition education as a strategy of improving child feeding knowledge and practices should be taken up by the public health sector so as to boost the fight against malnutrition which is a major problem in Uganda.},
     year = {2015}
    }
    

    Copy | Download

  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Nutrition Education Influences Child Feeding Knowledge Attitudes and Practices of Caregivers in Uganda
    AU  - Josephine Nabugoomu
    AU  - Agnes Namutebi
    AU  - Archileo N. Kaaya
    AU  - George Nasinyama
    Y1  - 2015/03/16
    PY  - 2015
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajhr.20150302.15
    DO  - 10.11648/j.ajhr.20150302.15
    T2  - American Journal of Health Research
    JF  - American Journal of Health Research
    JO  - American Journal of Health Research
    SP  - 82
    EP  - 90
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2330-8796
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajhr.20150302.15
    AB  - A Cross-sectional sample of households that were involved in farming of orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) and had 2–6 year old children were purposively selected from four divisions of Kampala Capital City Authority (Kawempe, Rubaga, Makindye and Nakawa) to participate in a controlled, cohort intervention. Respondents in Kawempe division had received training in production of OFSP and nutrition education; in Rubaga division respondents had only training in production of OFSP; in Nakawa division they only had nutrition education while in Makindye division the respondents did not training in nutrition education and production of OFSP and thus served as the control. A total of 457 households were involved in the study and a coded questionnaire was used to collect data on caregiver’s knowledge, attitudes and practices of child nutrition after the 12 month intervention. Chi-square tests were used to test for significant relationships (p≤0.05) amongst variables of interest. Results of the study show that majority of the children (2-6 years) take their meals from that of the family. At least 20% of the respondents serve lunch and dinner separately for the child with no significant differences among the divisions. Thus any major nutritional interventions should target the caregivers’ knowledge, attitudes and practices of child feeding and the first meal the child takes. On preparation of meat, 71% of the respondents who received nutrition education gave correct advice compared to 28% who did not receive the intervention. With regard to Maize porridge and beans preparation, significant differences could not be attributed to the intervention. However, 40% of the respondents in Nakawa and Makindye gave advice that was not helpful and so could not be adequately followed in the correct preparation of maize porridge and beans for the children. Preparation of kitoobero, a highly nutritious complementary dish for weaning children, was taught during the nutrition education sessions. Significantly more respondents who received nutrition education identified at least two combinations of foods used for kitoobero (65%) compared to about 5% of those who did not receive the intervention. The study found that majority of the respondents, 65% and 80% respectively in Kawempe and Rubaga compared to over 85% in Nakawa and Makindye had not prepared kitoobero seven days prior to the study. The results show that nutrition education significantly impacts on knowledge of meal preparation for weaning children, attitudes, and practices of child feeding. It is recommended that nutrition education as a strategy of improving child feeding knowledge and practices should be taken up by the public health sector so as to boost the fight against malnutrition which is a major problem in Uganda.
    VL  - 3
    IS  - 2
    ER  - 

    Copy | Download

Author Information
  • Department of Food Technology and Nutrition, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda

  • Department of Food Technology and Nutrition, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda

  • Department of Food Technology and Nutrition, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda

  • Department of Biosecurity, Ecosystems and Veterinary Public Health, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda

  • Sections