American Journal of Health Research

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An Individualised Learning and Exercise Program Based on the Bobath Concept to Facilitate Goal Achievement in People with Chronic Stroke

Received: Feb. 15, 2021    Accepted: Feb. 24, 2021    Published: Mar. 09, 2021
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Abstract

Background: To facilitate improvement in participation, therapy needs to be transferred into everyday life of people with chronic stroke. Individualised, home based, self-training exercise programs should be oriented towards the potential of the person, be specific to their ability and impairment levels, avoid compensation strategies as far as possible and operate at the upper limit of the individual’s ability level. Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of an individualised learning and exercise program based on the Bobath concept for facilitating personal goal achievement in people with chronic stroke. Method: Repeated measures design. Fifty-five people with chronic stroke were recruited from participants in Advanced Bobath training courses. During the five day course, participants learned individualised self-training programs, which they then carried out at home for three months, adapting their program according to their performance level. The primary outcome measure was the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) - Performance domain. Secondary measures included the COPM satisfaction domain, World Health Organisation Disability Assessment Score-2 (WHO-DAS2), and Goal Attainment Score (GAS). Measurements were taken three months and immediately prior to the Bobath course and three months after the course. Results: COPM-Perfomance, COPM-Satisfaction and the WHODAS-2 showed a significant difference over the time points, with followup scores significantly greater than both baseline and preintervention (p<.001). Sixty eight percent of participants achieved their personal goals (GAS). Conclusion: The study indicates that an individualised self-training approach based on Bobath principles may enable the transfer of acquired proficiency into the personal goals of people with chronic stroke.

DOI 10.11648/j.ajhr.20210901.14
Published in American Journal of Health Research ( Volume 9, Issue 1, January 2021 )
Page(s) 26-33
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Bobath, Individual Self Training, Exercise Program, Stroke

References
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  • APA Style

    Eckhardt Gabriele, Brock Kim, Haase Gerline, Ishida Toshie, Hummelsheim Horst. (2021). An Individualised Learning and Exercise Program Based on the Bobath Concept to Facilitate Goal Achievement in People with Chronic Stroke. American Journal of Health Research, 9(1), 26-33. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajhr.20210901.14

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    ACS Style

    Eckhardt Gabriele; Brock Kim; Haase Gerline; Ishida Toshie; Hummelsheim Horst. An Individualised Learning and Exercise Program Based on the Bobath Concept to Facilitate Goal Achievement in People with Chronic Stroke. Am. J. Health Res. 2021, 9(1), 26-33. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20210901.14

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    AMA Style

    Eckhardt Gabriele, Brock Kim, Haase Gerline, Ishida Toshie, Hummelsheim Horst. An Individualised Learning and Exercise Program Based on the Bobath Concept to Facilitate Goal Achievement in People with Chronic Stroke. Am J Health Res. 2021;9(1):26-33. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20210901.14

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ajhr.20210901.14,
      author = {Eckhardt Gabriele and Brock Kim and Haase Gerline and Ishida Toshie and Hummelsheim Horst},
      title = {An Individualised Learning and Exercise Program Based on the Bobath Concept to Facilitate Goal Achievement in People with Chronic Stroke},
      journal = {American Journal of Health Research},
      volume = {9},
      number = {1},
      pages = {26-33},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ajhr.20210901.14},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajhr.20210901.14},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ajhr.20210901.14},
      abstract = {Background: To facilitate improvement in participation, therapy needs to be transferred into everyday life of people with chronic stroke. Individualised, home based, self-training exercise programs should be oriented towards the potential of the person, be specific to their ability and impairment levels, avoid compensation strategies as far as possible and operate at the upper limit of the individual’s ability level. Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of an individualised learning and exercise program based on the Bobath concept for facilitating personal goal achievement in people with chronic stroke. Method: Repeated measures design. Fifty-five people with chronic stroke were recruited from participants in Advanced Bobath training courses. During the five day course, participants learned individualised self-training programs, which they then carried out at home for three months, adapting their program according to their performance level. The primary outcome measure was the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) - Performance domain. Secondary measures included the COPM satisfaction domain, World Health Organisation Disability Assessment Score-2 (WHO-DAS2), and Goal Attainment Score (GAS). Measurements were taken three months and immediately prior to the Bobath course and three months after the course. Results: COPM-Perfomance, COPM-Satisfaction and the WHODAS-2 showed a significant difference over the time points, with followup scores significantly greater than both baseline and preintervention (p<.001). Sixty eight percent of participants achieved their personal goals (GAS). Conclusion: The study indicates that an individualised self-training approach based on Bobath principles may enable the transfer of acquired proficiency into the personal goals of people with chronic stroke.},
     year = {2021}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - An Individualised Learning and Exercise Program Based on the Bobath Concept to Facilitate Goal Achievement in People with Chronic Stroke
    AU  - Eckhardt Gabriele
    AU  - Brock Kim
    AU  - Haase Gerline
    AU  - Ishida Toshie
    AU  - Hummelsheim Horst
    Y1  - 2021/03/09
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    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajhr.20210901.14
    DO  - 10.11648/j.ajhr.20210901.14
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    JF  - American Journal of Health Research
    JO  - American Journal of Health Research
    SP  - 26
    EP  - 33
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2330-8796
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajhr.20210901.14
    AB  - Background: To facilitate improvement in participation, therapy needs to be transferred into everyday life of people with chronic stroke. Individualised, home based, self-training exercise programs should be oriented towards the potential of the person, be specific to their ability and impairment levels, avoid compensation strategies as far as possible and operate at the upper limit of the individual’s ability level. Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of an individualised learning and exercise program based on the Bobath concept for facilitating personal goal achievement in people with chronic stroke. Method: Repeated measures design. Fifty-five people with chronic stroke were recruited from participants in Advanced Bobath training courses. During the five day course, participants learned individualised self-training programs, which they then carried out at home for three months, adapting their program according to their performance level. The primary outcome measure was the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) - Performance domain. Secondary measures included the COPM satisfaction domain, World Health Organisation Disability Assessment Score-2 (WHO-DAS2), and Goal Attainment Score (GAS). Measurements were taken three months and immediately prior to the Bobath course and three months after the course. Results: COPM-Perfomance, COPM-Satisfaction and the WHODAS-2 showed a significant difference over the time points, with followup scores significantly greater than both baseline and preintervention (p<.001). Sixty eight percent of participants achieved their personal goals (GAS). Conclusion: The study indicates that an individualised self-training approach based on Bobath principles may enable the transfer of acquired proficiency into the personal goals of people with chronic stroke.
    VL  - 9
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Author Information
  • Center of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Haan, Germany

  • St Vincent’s Hospital, Melbourne, Australia

  • Center of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Haan, Germany

  • Juntendo University Nerima Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

  • Neurological Rehabilitation Center-Leipzig, Leipzig-Bennewitz, Germany

  • Section