American Journal of Life Sciences

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The Effect of Coffee Expansion on Carbon Stock of Natural Forest in Gidame Woreda, West Ethiopia

Received: Aug. 28, 2022    Accepted: Sep. 06, 2022    Published: Nov. 14, 2022
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Abstract

The important climate-related functions of forest ecosystems are carbon sequestration, regulating the global carbon cycle and climate change mitigation. About 80% of the terrestrial carbon is stored as forest biomass and soil organic carbon. Deforestation and forest degradation show an alarming high, mainly due to the conversion of natural forest to commercial and cereal crop production. By considering this issue, this study was conducted with the aim to assess the effect of coffee expansion on carbon stock of the natural forest ecosystem in Gidame woreda. The study site was stratified in two strata: undisturbed natural forest and disturbed coffee forest. A total of 71 nested square sample plot was determined, proportionally allocated (29 for undisturbed and 42 for disturbed/coffee forest) and randomly distributed within each stratum. In both cases, the diameter at breast height and tree height were measured; litter sample was collected by harvesting and weighing technique. A total of 72 composite soil samples were also collected from proportionally and randomly selected 24 sample plots; 10 from undisturbed natural forest and 14 from disturbed coffee forest for SOC quantification in three layers (0-15cm, 16-30cm, and 31-45cm). From these forest inventory data, the above-ground biomass carbon stock was estimated by using allometric equations. The below-ground biomass carbon stock was derived from the above-ground carbon stock. The results showed that the biomass carbon stock was 298.758 ± 9.4tc/ha for undisturbed natural forest and 199.895 ± 11tc/ha for disturbed coffee forest and the difference is statistically significant as p < 0.05. This revealed that the disturbance of this natural forest ecosystem, which is associated with the conversion of natural forest to the coffee cultivation area, resulted in the loss of 33.09% of the biomass carbon stock. The SOC is 148.40 ± 12tc/ha for undisturbed forest and 153.80 ± 4.30tc/ha for disturbed coffee forest has no significant difference as p > 0.05. Therefore, maintaining the biomass carbon sequestration potential of this natural forest ecosystem should be required through the implementation of different conservation mechanisms.

DOI 10.11648/j.ajls.20221005.12
Published in American Journal of Life Sciences ( Volume 10, Issue 5, October 2022 )
Page(s) 104-114
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Carbon Stock, Coffee Forest, Disturbed Forest, Forest Degradation, Natural Forest, Undisturbed Forest

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    Yadesa Akena Dinsa. (2022). The Effect of Coffee Expansion on Carbon Stock of Natural Forest in Gidame Woreda, West Ethiopia. American Journal of Life Sciences, 10(5), 104-114. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajls.20221005.12

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    Yadesa Akena Dinsa. The Effect of Coffee Expansion on Carbon Stock of Natural Forest in Gidame Woreda, West Ethiopia. Am. J. Life Sci. 2022, 10(5), 104-114. doi: 10.11648/j.ajls.20221005.12

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    Yadesa Akena Dinsa. The Effect of Coffee Expansion on Carbon Stock of Natural Forest in Gidame Woreda, West Ethiopia. Am J Life Sci. 2022;10(5):104-114. doi: 10.11648/j.ajls.20221005.12

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ajls.20221005.12,
      author = {Yadesa Akena Dinsa},
      title = {The Effect of Coffee Expansion on Carbon Stock of Natural Forest in Gidame Woreda, West Ethiopia},
      journal = {American Journal of Life Sciences},
      volume = {10},
      number = {5},
      pages = {104-114},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ajls.20221005.12},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajls.20221005.12},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ajls.20221005.12},
      abstract = {The important climate-related functions of forest ecosystems are carbon sequestration, regulating the global carbon cycle and climate change mitigation. About 80% of the terrestrial carbon is stored as forest biomass and soil organic carbon. Deforestation and forest degradation show an alarming high, mainly due to the conversion of natural forest to commercial and cereal crop production. By considering this issue, this study was conducted with the aim to assess the effect of coffee expansion on carbon stock of the natural forest ecosystem in Gidame woreda. The study site was stratified in two strata: undisturbed natural forest and disturbed coffee forest. A total of 71 nested square sample plot was determined, proportionally allocated (29 for undisturbed and 42 for disturbed/coffee forest) and randomly distributed within each stratum. In both cases, the diameter at breast height and tree height were measured; litter sample was collected by harvesting and weighing technique. A total of 72 composite soil samples were also collected from proportionally and randomly selected 24 sample plots; 10 from undisturbed natural forest and 14 from disturbed coffee forest for SOC quantification in three layers (0-15cm, 16-30cm, and 31-45cm). From these forest inventory data, the above-ground biomass carbon stock was estimated by using allometric equations. The below-ground biomass carbon stock was derived from the above-ground carbon stock. The results showed that the biomass carbon stock was 298.758 ± 9.4tc/ha for undisturbed natural forest and 199.895 ± 11tc/ha for disturbed coffee forest and the difference is statistically significant as p  0.05. Therefore, maintaining the biomass carbon sequestration potential of this natural forest ecosystem should be required through the implementation of different conservation mechanisms.},
     year = {2022}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - The Effect of Coffee Expansion on Carbon Stock of Natural Forest in Gidame Woreda, West Ethiopia
    AU  - Yadesa Akena Dinsa
    Y1  - 2022/11/14
    PY  - 2022
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajls.20221005.12
    DO  - 10.11648/j.ajls.20221005.12
    T2  - American Journal of Life Sciences
    JF  - American Journal of Life Sciences
    JO  - American Journal of Life Sciences
    SP  - 104
    EP  - 114
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2328-5737
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajls.20221005.12
    AB  - The important climate-related functions of forest ecosystems are carbon sequestration, regulating the global carbon cycle and climate change mitigation. About 80% of the terrestrial carbon is stored as forest biomass and soil organic carbon. Deforestation and forest degradation show an alarming high, mainly due to the conversion of natural forest to commercial and cereal crop production. By considering this issue, this study was conducted with the aim to assess the effect of coffee expansion on carbon stock of the natural forest ecosystem in Gidame woreda. The study site was stratified in two strata: undisturbed natural forest and disturbed coffee forest. A total of 71 nested square sample plot was determined, proportionally allocated (29 for undisturbed and 42 for disturbed/coffee forest) and randomly distributed within each stratum. In both cases, the diameter at breast height and tree height were measured; litter sample was collected by harvesting and weighing technique. A total of 72 composite soil samples were also collected from proportionally and randomly selected 24 sample plots; 10 from undisturbed natural forest and 14 from disturbed coffee forest for SOC quantification in three layers (0-15cm, 16-30cm, and 31-45cm). From these forest inventory data, the above-ground biomass carbon stock was estimated by using allometric equations. The below-ground biomass carbon stock was derived from the above-ground carbon stock. The results showed that the biomass carbon stock was 298.758 ± 9.4tc/ha for undisturbed natural forest and 199.895 ± 11tc/ha for disturbed coffee forest and the difference is statistically significant as p  0.05. Therefore, maintaining the biomass carbon sequestration potential of this natural forest ecosystem should be required through the implementation of different conservation mechanisms.
    VL  - 10
    IS  - 5
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Forestry Department, Natural and Environmental Science Faculty, Wollega University, Gimbi, Ethiopa

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