American Journal of Networks and Communications

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Infrastructure Sharing Among Ghana’s Mobile Telecommunication Networks: Benefits and Challenges

Received: 25 March 2016    Accepted: 20 April 2016    Published: 12 May 2016
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Abstract

In Ghana network companies such as Vodafone, Mobile Telecommunication Network, Airtel, Tigo, Expresso and Globacom (GLO) are experiencing increasing subscribers for voice calls, internet and video services. Competition in the industry has been intensified making service providers searching for innovative strategies to survive the competition. Strategies adopted to survive the stiff competition include rebranding, infrastructure sharing and mergers and acquisitions. This study focuses on infrastructure sharing as a strategy to reducing cost for these telecommunication service providers in Ghana. Mobile telecommunication industry in developing countries has players a remarkable role in providing services to large portion of the population. Despite the achievement in reaching large numbers, extra efforts are needed to increase the mobile service penetration. In increasing the penetration, attention needs to be focused on the rural areas. High network infrastructure cost has been the major problem. As operators strive to recoup investment cost associated with building the expensive infrastructure, customers tends to suffer from high network charges/ prices. Infrastructure sharing presents itself as a means of lowering network deployment cost, especially in rural and marginalized areas. Sharing has an advantage to stimulate migration to new technologies and mobile broadband deployment. Arguably, another advantage is the stirring up of competition between mobile operators and service providers, when safeguards are used to prevent anti-competitive behavior.

DOI 10.11648/j.ajnc.20160502.14
Published in American Journal of Networks and Communications (Volume 5, Issue 2, April 2016)
Page(s) 35-45
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Telecommunication, Competition, Mobile, Telegraph

References
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  • APA Style

    Sylvester Hatsu, Ujakpa Martin Mabeifam, Philip Carlis Paitoo. (2016). Infrastructure Sharing Among Ghana’s Mobile Telecommunication Networks: Benefits and Challenges. American Journal of Networks and Communications, 5(2), 35-45. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajnc.20160502.14

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    ACS Style

    Sylvester Hatsu; Ujakpa Martin Mabeifam; Philip Carlis Paitoo. Infrastructure Sharing Among Ghana’s Mobile Telecommunication Networks: Benefits and Challenges. Am. J. Netw. Commun. 2016, 5(2), 35-45. doi: 10.11648/j.ajnc.20160502.14

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    AMA Style

    Sylvester Hatsu, Ujakpa Martin Mabeifam, Philip Carlis Paitoo. Infrastructure Sharing Among Ghana’s Mobile Telecommunication Networks: Benefits and Challenges. Am J Netw Commun. 2016;5(2):35-45. doi: 10.11648/j.ajnc.20160502.14

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ajnc.20160502.14,
      author = {Sylvester Hatsu and Ujakpa Martin Mabeifam and Philip Carlis Paitoo},
      title = {Infrastructure Sharing Among Ghana’s Mobile Telecommunication Networks: Benefits and Challenges},
      journal = {American Journal of Networks and Communications},
      volume = {5},
      number = {2},
      pages = {35-45},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ajnc.20160502.14},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajnc.20160502.14},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ajnc.20160502.14},
      abstract = {In Ghana network companies such as Vodafone, Mobile Telecommunication Network, Airtel, Tigo, Expresso and Globacom (GLO) are experiencing increasing subscribers for voice calls, internet and video services. Competition in the industry has been intensified making service providers searching for innovative strategies to survive the competition. Strategies adopted to survive the stiff competition include rebranding, infrastructure sharing and mergers and acquisitions. This study focuses on infrastructure sharing as a strategy to reducing cost for these telecommunication service providers in Ghana. Mobile telecommunication industry in developing countries has players a remarkable role in providing services to large portion of the population. Despite the achievement in reaching large numbers, extra efforts are needed to increase the mobile service penetration. In increasing the penetration, attention needs to be focused on the rural areas. High network infrastructure cost has been the major problem. As operators strive to recoup investment cost associated with building the expensive infrastructure, customers tends to suffer from high network charges/ prices. Infrastructure sharing presents itself as a means of lowering network deployment cost, especially in rural and marginalized areas. Sharing has an advantage to stimulate migration to new technologies and mobile broadband deployment. Arguably, another advantage is the stirring up of competition between mobile operators and service providers, when safeguards are used to prevent anti-competitive behavior.},
     year = {2016}
    }
    

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    AU  - Sylvester Hatsu
    AU  - Ujakpa Martin Mabeifam
    AU  - Philip Carlis Paitoo
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    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajnc.20160502.14
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    T2  - American Journal of Networks and Communications
    JF  - American Journal of Networks and Communications
    JO  - American Journal of Networks and Communications
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    EP  - 45
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2326-8964
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajnc.20160502.14
    AB  - In Ghana network companies such as Vodafone, Mobile Telecommunication Network, Airtel, Tigo, Expresso and Globacom (GLO) are experiencing increasing subscribers for voice calls, internet and video services. Competition in the industry has been intensified making service providers searching for innovative strategies to survive the competition. Strategies adopted to survive the stiff competition include rebranding, infrastructure sharing and mergers and acquisitions. This study focuses on infrastructure sharing as a strategy to reducing cost for these telecommunication service providers in Ghana. Mobile telecommunication industry in developing countries has players a remarkable role in providing services to large portion of the population. Despite the achievement in reaching large numbers, extra efforts are needed to increase the mobile service penetration. In increasing the penetration, attention needs to be focused on the rural areas. High network infrastructure cost has been the major problem. As operators strive to recoup investment cost associated with building the expensive infrastructure, customers tends to suffer from high network charges/ prices. Infrastructure sharing presents itself as a means of lowering network deployment cost, especially in rural and marginalized areas. Sharing has an advantage to stimulate migration to new technologies and mobile broadband deployment. Arguably, another advantage is the stirring up of competition between mobile operators and service providers, when safeguards are used to prevent anti-competitive behavior.
    VL  - 5
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Author Information
  • Computer Science Department, Accra Polytechnic, Accra, Ghana

  • Faculty of Information Technology and Systems Development, International University of Management (IUM), Dorado Park Campus, Windhoek, Namibia

  • Graduate School, Ghana Technology University College, Takoradi Campus, Accra, Ghana

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