Clinical Medicine Research

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Effects of Capsaicin on Coagulation: Will this be the New Blood Thinner

Received: 7 September 2014    Accepted: 18 September 2014    Published: 30 September 2014
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Abstract

Background: The effect of capsaicin (the active ingredient in Capsicum frutescensLinn. [Solanaceae] on coagulationwas reported in several studies. Current research is being directed at elucidating if capsaicin has any effect on coagulation. Objectives: To investigate if either the ethyl acetate extract of Capsicum frutescensLinn. [Solanaceae] (CFE) or capsaicin (FlukaBiotechnika-CPF) on coagulation. Methodss: The effects of ethyl acetate extract of Capsicum frutescensLinn. [Solanaceae] (CFE) and capsaicin (FlukaBiotechnika-CPF) was examined on rat hind paw Ten animals in each of three treatment groups received 2.5, 5.0, 10 mg/kg (i.p.) capsaicin respectively. Data obtained were pooled and analysed using repeated ANOVA, in a general linear model with the CPSS software. Results: Compared to the control group, the mean INR was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: Taken together, the use of capsaicin at therapeutic doses (2.5-10.0 mg/kg) may reduce thromboembolism without any clinically relevant alteration in platelets.

DOI 10.11648/j.cmr.20140305.17
Published in Clinical Medicine Research (Volume 3, Issue 5, September 2014)
Page(s) 145-149
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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Capsicum Frutescens, ‘Chili’, Ethylacetate Extract, Capsaicin, Coagulation

References
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[2] Boullion, D.J. (1981) Garlic as a platelet inhibitor. Lancet; 1:776-777.
[3] Brotman, D. J.Deitcher, S. R. Lip, G.Y. and Matzdorff, A.C. (2004) Virchow’s triad revisited. Southern Medical Journal, Birmingham, Alabama, 97 (2): 213-214.
[4] Byung, C.E. (1990). Generalization of the Hagen–Poiseuille velocity profile to non-Newtonian fluids and measurement of their viscosity. American Journal of Physics; (8)1: 83-84.
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[12] Jaiarj, P. Saichompoo, S. Wongkrajang, Y. Vongswan, N.Peungvicha, P. and Jiratchariyakul, W. (1998). Cardiovascular actions of capsaicinoids extract. Thai Capsicum Thai Journal of phytopharmacy; 5(2): 1-13.
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[17] Rowin, J. Lewis, S.L. (1996). Spontaneous bilateral subdural hematomas associated with chronic ginkgo biloba ingestion. Neurology 46: 17775-17777
[18] Rubin, R.N. (2001). Hematological diseases. National Medical Series for Independent Study- Medicine 4thed-Lippincott Williams & Wilkins-Philadelphia: 109-154
[19] Stoelting, R.K. and Dierdorf, S.F. (2002) Anaesthesiology and co-existing diseases. 4th ed. Churchill Livingstone. New York: 490-492.
[20] Virchow, R. L. K. (1858) Die Cellular pathologie in ihrer Begründung auf physiologische und pathologische Gewebelehre.Berlin, A. Hirschwald, 1858. English translation by F. Chance: Cellular Pathology. Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott, 1963.
[21] Virchow, R. L. K. (1856) Thrombose und Embolie. Gefässentzündung und septische Infektion In: Gesammelte Abhandlungen zur wissenschaftlichen Medicin. Frankfurt am Main, Von Meidinger& Sohn: 219-732. English translation by A. C. Matzdorff and W. R. Bell (1998) Thrombosis and Emboli. Canton, Massachusetts, Science History Publications.
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  • APA Style

    Jolayemi Adebayo Taiwo Ezekiel, Ojewole John Akanni Oluwole. (2014). Effects of Capsaicin on Coagulation: Will this be the New Blood Thinner. Clinical Medicine Research, 3(5), 145-149. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.cmr.20140305.17

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    ACS Style

    Jolayemi Adebayo Taiwo Ezekiel; Ojewole John Akanni Oluwole. Effects of Capsaicin on Coagulation: Will this be the New Blood Thinner. Clin. Med. Res. 2014, 3(5), 145-149. doi: 10.11648/j.cmr.20140305.17

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    AMA Style

    Jolayemi Adebayo Taiwo Ezekiel, Ojewole John Akanni Oluwole. Effects of Capsaicin on Coagulation: Will this be the New Blood Thinner. Clin Med Res. 2014;3(5):145-149. doi: 10.11648/j.cmr.20140305.17

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  • @article{10.11648/j.cmr.20140305.17,
      author = {Jolayemi Adebayo Taiwo Ezekiel and Ojewole John Akanni Oluwole},
      title = {Effects of Capsaicin on Coagulation: Will this be the New Blood Thinner},
      journal = {Clinical Medicine Research},
      volume = {3},
      number = {5},
      pages = {145-149},
      doi = {10.11648/j.cmr.20140305.17},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.cmr.20140305.17},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.cmr.20140305.17},
      abstract = {Background: The effect of capsaicin (the active ingredient in Capsicum frutescensLinn. [Solanaceae] on coagulationwas reported in several studies. Current research is being directed at elucidating if capsaicin has any effect on coagulation. Objectives: To investigate if either the ethyl acetate extract of Capsicum frutescensLinn. [Solanaceae] (CFE) or capsaicin (FlukaBiotechnika-CPF) on coagulation. Methodss: The effects of ethyl acetate extract of Capsicum frutescensLinn. [Solanaceae] (CFE) and capsaicin (FlukaBiotechnika-CPF) was examined on rat hind paw Ten animals in each of three treatment groups received 2.5, 5.0, 10 mg/kg (i.p.) capsaicin respectively. Data obtained were pooled and analysed using repeated ANOVA, in a general linear model with the CPSS software. Results: Compared to the control group, the mean INR was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: Taken together, the use of capsaicin at therapeutic doses (2.5-10.0 mg/kg) may reduce thromboembolism without any clinically relevant alteration in platelets.},
     year = {2014}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Effects of Capsaicin on Coagulation: Will this be the New Blood Thinner
    AU  - Jolayemi Adebayo Taiwo Ezekiel
    AU  - Ojewole John Akanni Oluwole
    Y1  - 2014/09/30
    PY  - 2014
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.cmr.20140305.17
    DO  - 10.11648/j.cmr.20140305.17
    T2  - Clinical Medicine Research
    JF  - Clinical Medicine Research
    JO  - Clinical Medicine Research
    SP  - 145
    EP  - 149
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2326-9057
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.cmr.20140305.17
    AB  - Background: The effect of capsaicin (the active ingredient in Capsicum frutescensLinn. [Solanaceae] on coagulationwas reported in several studies. Current research is being directed at elucidating if capsaicin has any effect on coagulation. Objectives: To investigate if either the ethyl acetate extract of Capsicum frutescensLinn. [Solanaceae] (CFE) or capsaicin (FlukaBiotechnika-CPF) on coagulation. Methodss: The effects of ethyl acetate extract of Capsicum frutescensLinn. [Solanaceae] (CFE) and capsaicin (FlukaBiotechnika-CPF) was examined on rat hind paw Ten animals in each of three treatment groups received 2.5, 5.0, 10 mg/kg (i.p.) capsaicin respectively. Data obtained were pooled and analysed using repeated ANOVA, in a general linear model with the CPSS software. Results: Compared to the control group, the mean INR was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: Taken together, the use of capsaicin at therapeutic doses (2.5-10.0 mg/kg) may reduce thromboembolism without any clinically relevant alteration in platelets.
    VL  - 3
    IS  - 5
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Department of Anaesthesia and ICU, Goulburn Base Hospital and Senior Lecturer Australia National University (ANU) Goulburn Campus, Goulburn City NSW, Australia

  • Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu Natal Durban, South Africa; Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Afe Babalola University, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria

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