Journal of Cancer Treatment and Research

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Exploring Barriers and Perceptions of Cervical Cancer Screening Among Reproductive Age Rural Women in Sadi Chanka District, Oromia, West Ethiopia: A Qualitative Study

Received: 8 September 2023    Accepted: 28 September 2023    Published: 28 October 2023
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Abstract

Background: Cervical cancer is the leading fourth most common disease affecting the reproductive organs of the women and challenges faced by women in their life. Cervical cancer screening is one of the global public health intervention used on a population at risk, or target population to diagnose a disease. Effective cervical cancer screening programs reduce morbidity and mortality due to this cancer. The study aimed to explore barriers and perceptions of cervical cancer screening among reproductive-age rural women in Sadi Chanka district, Oromia, West Ethiopia. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted in Sadi Chanka District of West Ethiopia through in-depth interviews with 28 study participants from November 1 to December 20, 2022. Data were collected by using semi-structured questionnaires and captured using an audio tape recorder and field note-taking. A homogeneous purposive sampling technique was used to select representative study participants. Participants' interviews were transcribed and translated according to the participants verbatim from the local language (Afan-Oromo) to the English language by language experts in both languages. The transcribed data were entered into Microsoft Word and analyzed using thematic analysis and presented in narrative forms using the respondent's verbatim as an illustration. Results: A total of twenty-eight study participants were involved in this study. Seven thematic areas were emerged from interviews of the respondents through thematic analysis of the data: The identified barriers and perceptions of the respondents towards cervical screening were categorized into the following thematic areas; Misinformation and awareness-related factors, the signs and symptoms of cervical cancer, gender preference for cervical screening services, side effects of the procedures, availability and affordability of the services, and prevention and treatment outcome of the disease were the key identified barriers and perceptions of cervical cancer screening. Conclusion: The finding explored and revealed that misinformation, lack of awareness about cervical cancer screening services, lack of cervical screening services at all health facilities, the risk factors of cervical cancer, signs and symptoms of cervical cancer, gender preference for screening services, side effects of procedures, availability and affordability of the cervical cancer screening services, and prevention and treatment outcome of the disease were the key barriers and perceptions of cervical screening among rural reproductive age women. Therefore, the Sadi Chanka district health office should work on cervical cancer screening services to improve rural women's barriers and perceptions of cervical cancer service screening, efforts should be focused on enhancing awareness and related factors.

DOI 10.11648/j.jctr.20231103.12
Published in Journal of Cancer Treatment and Research (Volume 11, Issue 3, September 2023)
Page(s) 32-37
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Cervical Cancer, Cervical Cancer Screening, Barriers, Perception, Exploring, Reproductive age, Ethiopia

References
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[2] American Cancer Society. What is Cervical Cancer? J Gynecol Womens Heal. 2017; 2 (5): 1–9.
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[4] World Health Organization (WHO). Cervical Cancer Guidance for Operation: Cervical cancer prevention, screening, and treatment of pre-cancer, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer Guidance for MSF Operations. Msf. 2018; (April): 1–9.
[5] Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia Ministry of Health: National guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections using the syndromic approach. Fed Minist Heal. 2015; (July).
[6] World Health Organization (WHO). Global strategy to accelerate the elimination of cervical cancer as a public health problem. 2020. 1–56 p.
[7] World Health Organization (WHO). Guidelines for Comprehensive Cervical Cancer Control. 2014; 2: 1–408.
[8] American Cancer Society. Cervical Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Risk Factors for Cervical Cancer. 2020; 1–15.
[9] Ethiopian Public Health Institute. Services Availability and Readiness Assessment (SARA) Ethiopian Public Health Institute Ethiopia Service Availability and Readiness Assessment (SARA) 2018 Final Report. 2018; 1–119.
[10] Gakidou E, Nordhagen S, Obermeyer Z. Coverage of Cervical Cancer Screening in 57 Countries: Low Average Levels and Large Inequalities. PLoS One. 2008; 5 (6): 863–8.
[11] Federal Ministry of Health Ethiopia. National Cancer Control Plan 2016-2020. 2020; (October 2015).
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[13] Gizaw M, Ayele W, Getachew E, Getachew S, Addissie A, Kantelhardt E. Cervical cancer screening knowledge and barriers among women in Addis Ababa. PLoS One. 2019; 7: 1–13.
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[17] Natae SF, Nigatu DT, Negawo MK, Mengesha WW.: Cervical Cancer Screening Uptake and Determinant Factors Among Women in Ambo Town: Community based Cross-Sectional Study. Res Sq. 2020; 1–17.
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[19] Muiruri P, Njuguma E, Ilovi S, Mutai K, Kinuthia J, Njoroge P. Factors influencing cervical cancer screening in a Kenyan Health Facility: a mixed qualitative and quantitative study. ResearchGate. 2017; (March).
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  • APA Style

    Ararso Hordofa Guye, Dame Banti Shambi, Tadesse Nigussie, Elsabeth Lagesse, Negasa Shuma Dureso, et al. (2023). Exploring Barriers and Perceptions of Cervical Cancer Screening Among Reproductive Age Rural Women in Sadi Chanka District, Oromia, West Ethiopia: A Qualitative Study . Journal of Cancer Treatment and Research, 11(3), 32-37. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jctr.20231103.12

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    ACS Style

    Ararso Hordofa Guye; Dame Banti Shambi; Tadesse Nigussie; Elsabeth Lagesse; Negasa Shuma Dureso, et al. Exploring Barriers and Perceptions of Cervical Cancer Screening Among Reproductive Age Rural Women in Sadi Chanka District, Oromia, West Ethiopia: A Qualitative Study . J. Cancer Treat. Res. 2023, 11(3), 32-37. doi: 10.11648/j.jctr.20231103.12

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    AMA Style

    Ararso Hordofa Guye, Dame Banti Shambi, Tadesse Nigussie, Elsabeth Lagesse, Negasa Shuma Dureso, et al. Exploring Barriers and Perceptions of Cervical Cancer Screening Among Reproductive Age Rural Women in Sadi Chanka District, Oromia, West Ethiopia: A Qualitative Study . J Cancer Treat Res. 2023;11(3):32-37. doi: 10.11648/j.jctr.20231103.12

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  • @article{10.11648/j.jctr.20231103.12,
      author = {Ararso Hordofa Guye and Dame Banti Shambi and Tadesse Nigussie and Elsabeth Lagesse and Negasa Shuma Dureso and Efa Bayissa Kanea and Kasim Hansa},
      title = {Exploring Barriers and Perceptions of Cervical Cancer Screening Among Reproductive Age Rural Women in Sadi Chanka District, Oromia, West Ethiopia: A Qualitative Study
    
    	
    },
      journal = {Journal of Cancer Treatment and Research},
      volume = {11},
      number = {3},
      pages = {32-37},
      doi = {10.11648/j.jctr.20231103.12},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jctr.20231103.12},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.jctr.20231103.12},
      abstract = {Background: Cervical cancer is the leading fourth most common disease affecting the reproductive organs of the women and challenges faced by women in their life. Cervical cancer screening is one of the global public health intervention used on a population at risk, or target population to diagnose a disease. Effective cervical cancer screening programs reduce morbidity and mortality due to this cancer. The study aimed to explore barriers and perceptions of cervical cancer screening among reproductive-age rural women in Sadi Chanka district, Oromia, West Ethiopia. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted in Sadi Chanka District of West Ethiopia through in-depth interviews with 28 study participants from November 1 to December 20, 2022. Data were collected by using semi-structured questionnaires and captured using an audio tape recorder and field note-taking. A homogeneous purposive sampling technique was used to select representative study participants. Participants' interviews were transcribed and translated according to the participants verbatim from the local language (Afan-Oromo) to the English language by language experts in both languages. The transcribed data were entered into Microsoft Word and analyzed using thematic analysis and presented in narrative forms using the respondent's verbatim as an illustration. Results: A total of twenty-eight study participants were involved in this study. Seven thematic areas were emerged from interviews of the respondents through thematic analysis of the data: The identified barriers and perceptions of the respondents towards cervical screening were categorized into the following thematic areas; Misinformation and awareness-related factors, the signs and symptoms of cervical cancer, gender preference for cervical screening services, side effects of the procedures, availability and affordability of the services, and prevention and treatment outcome of the disease were the key identified barriers and perceptions of cervical cancer screening. Conclusion: The finding explored and revealed that misinformation, lack of awareness about cervical cancer screening services, lack of cervical screening services at all health facilities, the risk factors of cervical cancer, signs and symptoms of cervical cancer, gender preference for screening services, side effects of procedures, availability and affordability of the cervical cancer screening services, and prevention and treatment outcome of the disease were the key barriers and perceptions of cervical screening among rural reproductive age women. Therefore, the Sadi Chanka district health office should work on cervical cancer screening services to improve rural women's barriers and perceptions of cervical cancer service screening, efforts should be focused on enhancing awareness and related factors.
    },
     year = {2023}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Exploring Barriers and Perceptions of Cervical Cancer Screening Among Reproductive Age Rural Women in Sadi Chanka District, Oromia, West Ethiopia: A Qualitative Study
    
    	
    
    AU  - Ararso Hordofa Guye
    AU  - Dame Banti Shambi
    AU  - Tadesse Nigussie
    AU  - Elsabeth Lagesse
    AU  - Negasa Shuma Dureso
    AU  - Efa Bayissa Kanea
    AU  - Kasim Hansa
    Y1  - 2023/10/28
    PY  - 2023
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jctr.20231103.12
    DO  - 10.11648/j.jctr.20231103.12
    T2  - Journal of Cancer Treatment and Research
    JF  - Journal of Cancer Treatment and Research
    JO  - Journal of Cancer Treatment and Research
    SP  - 32
    EP  - 37
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2376-7790
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jctr.20231103.12
    AB  - Background: Cervical cancer is the leading fourth most common disease affecting the reproductive organs of the women and challenges faced by women in their life. Cervical cancer screening is one of the global public health intervention used on a population at risk, or target population to diagnose a disease. Effective cervical cancer screening programs reduce morbidity and mortality due to this cancer. The study aimed to explore barriers and perceptions of cervical cancer screening among reproductive-age rural women in Sadi Chanka district, Oromia, West Ethiopia. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted in Sadi Chanka District of West Ethiopia through in-depth interviews with 28 study participants from November 1 to December 20, 2022. Data were collected by using semi-structured questionnaires and captured using an audio tape recorder and field note-taking. A homogeneous purposive sampling technique was used to select representative study participants. Participants' interviews were transcribed and translated according to the participants verbatim from the local language (Afan-Oromo) to the English language by language experts in both languages. The transcribed data were entered into Microsoft Word and analyzed using thematic analysis and presented in narrative forms using the respondent's verbatim as an illustration. Results: A total of twenty-eight study participants were involved in this study. Seven thematic areas were emerged from interviews of the respondents through thematic analysis of the data: The identified barriers and perceptions of the respondents towards cervical screening were categorized into the following thematic areas; Misinformation and awareness-related factors, the signs and symptoms of cervical cancer, gender preference for cervical screening services, side effects of the procedures, availability and affordability of the services, and prevention and treatment outcome of the disease were the key identified barriers and perceptions of cervical cancer screening. Conclusion: The finding explored and revealed that misinformation, lack of awareness about cervical cancer screening services, lack of cervical screening services at all health facilities, the risk factors of cervical cancer, signs and symptoms of cervical cancer, gender preference for screening services, side effects of procedures, availability and affordability of the cervical cancer screening services, and prevention and treatment outcome of the disease were the key barriers and perceptions of cervical screening among rural reproductive age women. Therefore, the Sadi Chanka district health office should work on cervical cancer screening services to improve rural women's barriers and perceptions of cervical cancer service screening, efforts should be focused on enhancing awareness and related factors.
    
    VL  - 11
    IS  - 3
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Salale University, Fitche, Ethiopia

  • Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Salale University, Fitche, Ethiopia

  • Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Salale University, Fitche, Ethiopia

  • Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Salale University, Fitche, Ethiopia

  • Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Salale University, Fitche, Ethiopia

  • Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Salale University, Fitche, Ethiopia

  • Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Salale University, Fitche, Ethiopia

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