Journal of Plant Sciences

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Genetic Variability for Yield and Yield Related Traits in Advanced Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Lines in Eastern Ethiopia

Received: Dec. 02, 2021    Accepted: Jan. 05, 2022    Published: Jan. 12, 2022
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Abstract

Developing high yielding bread wheat genotypes with superior agronomic trait requires understanding the extent of genetic variability in existing germplasm. The current study was designed to generate information on genetic variability and inheritance of yield and its component traits using 36 advanced bread wheat lines. Field experiment was conducted in 2018 cropping season at Haramaya and Hirna in eastern Ethiopia using triple lattice design. Fifteen quantitative traits were measured and subjected to analysis of variance and genetic analyses. Analysis of variance revealed that there was highly significant difference among genotypes for all quantitative traits at both locations. The lowest and the highest phenotypic (PCV) and genotypic (GCV) values were obtained for hectoliter weight and number of fertile tillers per plant, respectively at both locations. Heritability in broad sense and genetic advance as percent of mean ranged from 39.1% (number of kernels per spike) to 90.1% (days to heading), and from 2.4% (hectoliter weight) to 48.5% (number of fertile tillers), respectively at Haramaya. At Hirna, these parameters ranged from 29.3% (hectoliter weight) to 91.9% (grain yield), and from 1.5% (hectoliter weight) to 27.6% (total tillers per plant), respectively. high heritability coupled with high genetic advance as percent of mean was observed for total number of tillers per plant, number of fertile tillers per plant, grain yield per hectare, and above ground biomass per hectare at Haramaya. and for spike length, total number of tiller per plant, number of fertile tiller per plant, grain yield per hectare, and above ground biomass per hectare at Hirna. This indicates that improvement of these traits through selection is easier than other traits measured.

DOI 10.11648/j.jps.20221001.12
Published in Journal of Plant Sciences ( Volume 10, Issue 1, February 2022 )
Page(s) 12-18
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Variability, Genetic Advance, Heritability

References
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    Almaz Bedada, Bulti Tesso, Ermias Habte. (2022). Genetic Variability for Yield and Yield Related Traits in Advanced Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Lines in Eastern Ethiopia. Journal of Plant Sciences, 10(1), 12-18. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jps.20221001.12

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    ACS Style

    Almaz Bedada; Bulti Tesso; Ermias Habte. Genetic Variability for Yield and Yield Related Traits in Advanced Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Lines in Eastern Ethiopia. J. Plant Sci. 2022, 10(1), 12-18. doi: 10.11648/j.jps.20221001.12

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    AMA Style

    Almaz Bedada, Bulti Tesso, Ermias Habte. Genetic Variability for Yield and Yield Related Traits in Advanced Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Lines in Eastern Ethiopia. J Plant Sci. 2022;10(1):12-18. doi: 10.11648/j.jps.20221001.12

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  • @article{10.11648/j.jps.20221001.12,
      author = {Almaz Bedada and Bulti Tesso and Ermias Habte},
      title = {Genetic Variability for Yield and Yield Related Traits in Advanced Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Lines in Eastern Ethiopia},
      journal = {Journal of Plant Sciences},
      volume = {10},
      number = {1},
      pages = {12-18},
      doi = {10.11648/j.jps.20221001.12},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jps.20221001.12},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.j.jps.20221001.12},
      abstract = {Developing high yielding bread wheat genotypes with superior agronomic trait requires understanding the extent of genetic variability in existing germplasm. The current study was designed to generate information on genetic variability and inheritance of yield and its component traits using 36 advanced bread wheat lines. Field experiment was conducted in 2018 cropping season at Haramaya and Hirna in eastern Ethiopia using triple lattice design. Fifteen quantitative traits were measured and subjected to analysis of variance and genetic analyses. Analysis of variance revealed that there was highly significant difference among genotypes for all quantitative traits at both locations. The lowest and the highest phenotypic (PCV) and genotypic (GCV) values were obtained for hectoliter weight and number of fertile tillers per plant, respectively at both locations. Heritability in broad sense and genetic advance as percent of mean ranged from 39.1% (number of kernels per spike) to 90.1% (days to heading), and from 2.4% (hectoliter weight) to 48.5% (number of fertile tillers), respectively at Haramaya. At Hirna, these parameters ranged from 29.3% (hectoliter weight) to 91.9% (grain yield), and from 1.5% (hectoliter weight) to 27.6% (total tillers per plant), respectively. high heritability coupled with high genetic advance as percent of mean was observed for total number of tillers per plant, number of fertile tillers per plant, grain yield per hectare, and above ground biomass per hectare at Haramaya. and for spike length, total number of tiller per plant, number of fertile tiller per plant, grain yield per hectare, and above ground biomass per hectare at Hirna. This indicates that improvement of these traits through selection is easier than other traits measured.},
     year = {2022}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Genetic Variability for Yield and Yield Related Traits in Advanced Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Lines in Eastern Ethiopia
    AU  - Almaz Bedada
    AU  - Bulti Tesso
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    DO  - 10.11648/j.jps.20221001.12
    T2  - Journal of Plant Sciences
    JF  - Journal of Plant Sciences
    JO  - Journal of Plant Sciences
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    SN  - 2331-0731
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jps.20221001.12
    AB  - Developing high yielding bread wheat genotypes with superior agronomic trait requires understanding the extent of genetic variability in existing germplasm. The current study was designed to generate information on genetic variability and inheritance of yield and its component traits using 36 advanced bread wheat lines. Field experiment was conducted in 2018 cropping season at Haramaya and Hirna in eastern Ethiopia using triple lattice design. Fifteen quantitative traits were measured and subjected to analysis of variance and genetic analyses. Analysis of variance revealed that there was highly significant difference among genotypes for all quantitative traits at both locations. The lowest and the highest phenotypic (PCV) and genotypic (GCV) values were obtained for hectoliter weight and number of fertile tillers per plant, respectively at both locations. Heritability in broad sense and genetic advance as percent of mean ranged from 39.1% (number of kernels per spike) to 90.1% (days to heading), and from 2.4% (hectoliter weight) to 48.5% (number of fertile tillers), respectively at Haramaya. At Hirna, these parameters ranged from 29.3% (hectoliter weight) to 91.9% (grain yield), and from 1.5% (hectoliter weight) to 27.6% (total tillers per plant), respectively. high heritability coupled with high genetic advance as percent of mean was observed for total number of tillers per plant, number of fertile tillers per plant, grain yield per hectare, and above ground biomass per hectare at Haramaya. and for spike length, total number of tiller per plant, number of fertile tiller per plant, grain yield per hectare, and above ground biomass per hectare at Hirna. This indicates that improvement of these traits through selection is easier than other traits measured.
    VL  - 10
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Author Information
  • Plant Science Department, School of Agriculture, Ambo University, Ambo, Ethiopia

  • Plant Science Department, College of Agricultural and Environmental Science, Haramaya University, Dire Dewa, Ethiopia

  • International Livestock Research Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Section