American Journal of Nursing Science

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Access to Institutional Delivery of Mothers in Adigrat Town, Northern Ethiopia

Received: 28 October 2014    Accepted: 7 November 2014    Published: 20 November 2014
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Abstract

Background: Institutional delivery has a great role in reducing maternal and child mortality. Yet maternal mortality remains a major challenge to health system worldwide. And the Maternal mortality rate in Ethiopia continues to be an acceptable high level. The main aim of this study is to assess the level of access to health institution for maternal delivery and identify the underlying reasons. Methods: We have use community based cross sectional study design, data was collected using structured interview from mothers who have at least one delivery with the last five years. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS, descriptive statistics were performed results are presented in terms of Frequency and percentage. Result: Majority 179(75.8%) were in an age range of 18 – 35 years. Majority 208(88.1%) of our study subjects were attended antenatal care (ANC) follow up and majority of them 160(77.3%), 38(18.4%) and have followed ANC four times throughout their last pregnancy. Out of 208 respondents attended ANC follow up, 185(89.4%) have received all the necessary in formations, advice on birth preparedness and complication readiness. Of those who have no ANC follow up 28 (11.9%) ,half of them were due to reason that they have no any problem in their pregnancy and the other are due to too far distance home to health facility 5( 17.8)%. Majority, 201(85.2%) were delivered at health institution. The most common reasons for home delivery were normal previous delivery, labor at night, comfort at home, unwelcoming approaches of health workers. Conclusion: Institutional delivery coverage of the study area is good which 85.1% in the last five years. The ANC coverage 88.1% of the area is not proportional with the institutional delivery 85.1% which indicates that there is a gap in health education during ANC follow up especially about birth preparedness and complication readiness.

DOI 10.11648/j.ajns.20140305.15
Published in American Journal of Nursing Science (Volume 3, Issue 5, October 2014)
Page(s) 87-90
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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Maternal Health, Delivery, ANC, Ethiopia

References
[1] World Health Organization: trends in maternal mortality: 1990-2010 estimates developed by WHO,UNFPA and the world bank. Geneva 2012
[2] Central statistical agency [Ethiopia] and ICF International: Ethiopia demographic and health survey 2011: Addis Ababa. Ethiopia and Calverton .Marviand.USA: central statistical agency and ICF
[3] World Health Organization: Maternal mortality (2012)url:http/www.who.int/mediacentte fact sheets/fs348/en/index. html
[4] Nawal M. Nour (2008).an introduction to maternal mortality .Reviews in obstetrics and gynecology (2):77-81.
[5] Edward. E.N ketiah-Amponsah (2009) expectant mothers and the demand for institutional delivery; Do household income and access to health information. some insight from Ghana. European journal of social science. 8.3.
[6] World health organization (2005).maternal mortality fact sheets. www.who org.Accessed on June 25, 2009.
[7] WHO. World health organization (2005).facts sheets maternal mortality.
[8] Prata L.passano P. rowel Bells Walsh J.and Potts Where there are (few birth attendants).J0urnal of health nutrition. Population
[9] Department of Reproductive health and research: proportion of births attended by a skilled birth worker by WHO Geneva; 2008 updates.url:http//www.who.int/reproductive health/publications maternal-perinatal-health/2008-skilled attendant.pdfl:
[10] Amano A, Gebeyehu A and Birhanu Z: institutional service utilization in monisa wereda, south east Ethiopia: a community based cross sectional study, BMC pregnancy child birth 2012, 12:105.
[11] AberaM, G/mariamA, and Belachew T: predictors of safe delivery utilization in Arsi zone, south east Ethiopia Journal of health sciences: 2011: yol. 21, special issue: 101-13.
[12] Tura G, G/mriam: safedelivery service utilization in in Metekel zone, North West Ethiopia. Ethiopia Journal of health science. 2011:17(4):233-222.
[13] Nigussie M, D,Mitike G: assessment of safe delivery utilization among mothers of child bearing age in north Gonder zone, North West Ethiopia. Ethiopian Journal health development.2004; 18(3):145-152.
[14] Tefera AS, Alemu FM, weldeyowahns SM: Institutional service utilization and associated factors among mothers who gave birth in the last 12 months in sekela district North West of Ethiopia community based cross sectional study BMC pregnancy and child birth 2012,12(74):1-11
[15] Central statistical [Ethiopia] and Ethiopia demographic health survey2005: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia and Calverton .Maryland USA: central statistical agency and ICF international.
[16] WHO. UNICEF and UNFPA. Maternal mortality in 1995; estimates developed by WHO/UNICEF, Geneva, 2001.
[17] Omar MM. women’s health in rural Somali licentiate Dissertation, 1994
[18] World health organization UNICEF/. Revived 1990 estimates of maternal mortality: Anew approach by world health organization Geneva, 1996.
[19] Federal Minister of health, health and health related indicators, 2005, Addis Ababa.
[20] UNICEF.progress on maternal mortality, Geneva, 1996.
[21] WHO (2005) causes of maternal mortality. WWW.Maternity world wid.org.
[22] Central statistical agency[Ethiopia] and ORC MACRO 2011 “Ethiopia Demographic and health survey 2011” Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
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  • APA Style

    Kidane Tadesse, Addisu Haile, Michael Tezera, Alemtsehay Tewele. (2014). Access to Institutional Delivery of Mothers in Adigrat Town, Northern Ethiopia. American Journal of Nursing Science, 3(5), 87-90. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajns.20140305.15

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    ACS Style

    Kidane Tadesse; Addisu Haile; Michael Tezera; Alemtsehay Tewele. Access to Institutional Delivery of Mothers in Adigrat Town, Northern Ethiopia. Am. J. Nurs. Sci. 2014, 3(5), 87-90. doi: 10.11648/j.ajns.20140305.15

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    AMA Style

    Kidane Tadesse, Addisu Haile, Michael Tezera, Alemtsehay Tewele. Access to Institutional Delivery of Mothers in Adigrat Town, Northern Ethiopia. Am J Nurs Sci. 2014;3(5):87-90. doi: 10.11648/j.ajns.20140305.15

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ajns.20140305.15,
      author = {Kidane Tadesse and Addisu Haile and Michael Tezera and Alemtsehay Tewele},
      title = {Access to Institutional Delivery of Mothers in Adigrat Town, Northern Ethiopia},
      journal = {American Journal of Nursing Science},
      volume = {3},
      number = {5},
      pages = {87-90},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ajns.20140305.15},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajns.20140305.15},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ajns.20140305.15},
      abstract = {Background: Institutional delivery has a great role in reducing maternal and child mortality. Yet maternal mortality remains a major challenge to health system worldwide. And the Maternal mortality rate in Ethiopia continues to be an acceptable high level. The main aim of this study is to assess the level of access to health institution for maternal delivery and identify the underlying reasons. Methods: We have use community based cross sectional study design, data was collected using structured interview from mothers who have at least one delivery with the last five years. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS, descriptive statistics were performed results are presented in terms of Frequency and percentage. Result: Majority 179(75.8%) were in an age range of 18 – 35 years. Majority 208(88.1%) of our study subjects were attended antenatal care (ANC) follow up and majority of them 160(77.3%), 38(18.4%) and have followed ANC four times throughout their last pregnancy. Out of 208 respondents attended ANC follow up, 185(89.4%) have received all the necessary in formations, advice on birth preparedness and complication readiness. Of those who have no ANC follow up 28 (11.9%) ,half of them were due to reason that they have no any problem in their pregnancy and the other are due to too far distance home to health facility 5( 17.8)%. Majority, 201(85.2%) were delivered at health institution. The most common reasons for home delivery were normal previous delivery, labor at night, comfort at home, unwelcoming approaches of health workers. Conclusion: Institutional delivery coverage of the study area is good which 85.1% in the last five years. The ANC coverage 88.1% of the area is not proportional with the institutional delivery 85.1% which indicates that there is a gap in health education during ANC follow up especially about birth preparedness and complication readiness.},
     year = {2014}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Access to Institutional Delivery of Mothers in Adigrat Town, Northern Ethiopia
    AU  - Kidane Tadesse
    AU  - Addisu Haile
    AU  - Michael Tezera
    AU  - Alemtsehay Tewele
    Y1  - 2014/11/20
    PY  - 2014
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajns.20140305.15
    DO  - 10.11648/j.ajns.20140305.15
    T2  - American Journal of Nursing Science
    JF  - American Journal of Nursing Science
    JO  - American Journal of Nursing Science
    SP  - 87
    EP  - 90
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2328-5753
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajns.20140305.15
    AB  - Background: Institutional delivery has a great role in reducing maternal and child mortality. Yet maternal mortality remains a major challenge to health system worldwide. And the Maternal mortality rate in Ethiopia continues to be an acceptable high level. The main aim of this study is to assess the level of access to health institution for maternal delivery and identify the underlying reasons. Methods: We have use community based cross sectional study design, data was collected using structured interview from mothers who have at least one delivery with the last five years. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS, descriptive statistics were performed results are presented in terms of Frequency and percentage. Result: Majority 179(75.8%) were in an age range of 18 – 35 years. Majority 208(88.1%) of our study subjects were attended antenatal care (ANC) follow up and majority of them 160(77.3%), 38(18.4%) and have followed ANC four times throughout their last pregnancy. Out of 208 respondents attended ANC follow up, 185(89.4%) have received all the necessary in formations, advice on birth preparedness and complication readiness. Of those who have no ANC follow up 28 (11.9%) ,half of them were due to reason that they have no any problem in their pregnancy and the other are due to too far distance home to health facility 5( 17.8)%. Majority, 201(85.2%) were delivered at health institution. The most common reasons for home delivery were normal previous delivery, labor at night, comfort at home, unwelcoming approaches of health workers. Conclusion: Institutional delivery coverage of the study area is good which 85.1% in the last five years. The ANC coverage 88.1% of the area is not proportional with the institutional delivery 85.1% which indicates that there is a gap in health education during ANC follow up especially about birth preparedness and complication readiness.
    VL  - 3
    IS  - 5
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Department of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia

  • Department of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia

  • Department of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia

  • Department of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia

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