American Journal of Sports Science

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Energy Expenditure During Incline Walking – Benefits of Integrating a Barometer into Activity Monitors

Received: Feb. 15, 2018    Accepted: Mar. 14, 2018    Published: Apr. 04, 2018
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Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to compare different methods to determine energy expenditure (EE) on incline walking. Approach: The methods tested were a conventional triaxial accelerometer (GT3X), a versatile system (SenseWear), both utilizing single regression models, and a device equipped with a triaxial accelerometer and an air pressure sensor (move II). Twenty-five healthy participants wore the activity monitors and a portable indirect calorimeter (IC) as reference while walking up- and downhill as well as up- and downstairs. The accuracy of the three devices for estimating EE was assessed based on Pearson correlation, ICC, and Bland–Altman analysis. Main results: For GT3X and SenseWear the ICCs showed a weak correlation (between 0.42 and 0.08) and for move II a strong correlation (between 0.97 and 0.84) between the prediction of energy cost and the output from IC, respectively. Overall, the differences absolute to the IC values were 11 to 35 (12 to 30) times higher for the GT3X (SenseWear) than for the move II devices. Significance: The study showed that a device equipped with an accelerometer and an air pressure sensor had higher accuracy in predicting EE during incline walking than a conventional accelerometer or a versatile system.

DOI 10.11648/j.ajss.20180602.13
Published in American Journal of Sports Science ( Volume 6, Issue 2, June 2018 )
Page(s) 47-54
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Accelerometry, Validation, Indirect Calorimetry, Physical Activity

References
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Cite This Article
  • APA Style

    Armbruster Manuel, Anastasopoulou Panagiota, Altmann Stefan, Ringhof Steffen, Neumann Rainer, et al. (2018). Energy Expenditure During Incline Walking – Benefits of Integrating a Barometer into Activity Monitors. American Journal of Sports Science, 6(2), 47-54. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajss.20180602.13

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    ACS Style

    Armbruster Manuel; Anastasopoulou Panagiota; Altmann Stefan; Ringhof Steffen; Neumann Rainer, et al. Energy Expenditure During Incline Walking – Benefits of Integrating a Barometer into Activity Monitors. Am. J. Sports Sci. 2018, 6(2), 47-54. doi: 10.11648/j.ajss.20180602.13

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    AMA Style

    Armbruster Manuel, Anastasopoulou Panagiota, Altmann Stefan, Ringhof Steffen, Neumann Rainer, et al. Energy Expenditure During Incline Walking – Benefits of Integrating a Barometer into Activity Monitors. Am J Sports Sci. 2018;6(2):47-54. doi: 10.11648/j.ajss.20180602.13

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ajss.20180602.13,
      author = {Armbruster Manuel and Anastasopoulou Panagiota and Altmann Stefan and Ringhof Steffen and Neumann Rainer and Haertel Sascha and Woll Alexander},
      title = {Energy Expenditure During Incline Walking – Benefits of Integrating a Barometer into Activity Monitors},
      journal = {American Journal of Sports Science},
      volume = {6},
      number = {2},
      pages = {47-54},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ajss.20180602.13},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajss.20180602.13},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ajss.20180602.13},
      abstract = {Objective: This study aimed to compare different methods to determine energy expenditure (EE) on incline walking. Approach: The methods tested were a conventional triaxial accelerometer (GT3X), a versatile system (SenseWear), both utilizing single regression models, and a device equipped with a triaxial accelerometer and an air pressure sensor (move II). Twenty-five healthy participants wore the activity monitors and a portable indirect calorimeter (IC) as reference while walking up- and downhill as well as up- and downstairs. The accuracy of the three devices for estimating EE was assessed based on Pearson correlation, ICC, and Bland–Altman analysis. Main results: For GT3X and SenseWear the ICCs showed a weak correlation (between 0.42 and 0.08) and for move II a strong correlation (between 0.97 and 0.84) between the prediction of energy cost and the output from IC, respectively. Overall, the differences absolute to the IC values were 11 to 35 (12 to 30) times higher for the GT3X (SenseWear) than for the move II devices. Significance: The study showed that a device equipped with an accelerometer and an air pressure sensor had higher accuracy in predicting EE during incline walking than a conventional accelerometer or a versatile system.},
     year = {2018}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Energy Expenditure During Incline Walking – Benefits of Integrating a Barometer into Activity Monitors
    AU  - Armbruster Manuel
    AU  - Anastasopoulou Panagiota
    AU  - Altmann Stefan
    AU  - Ringhof Steffen
    AU  - Neumann Rainer
    AU  - Haertel Sascha
    AU  - Woll Alexander
    Y1  - 2018/04/04
    PY  - 2018
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajss.20180602.13
    DO  - 10.11648/j.ajss.20180602.13
    T2  - American Journal of Sports Science
    JF  - American Journal of Sports Science
    JO  - American Journal of Sports Science
    SP  - 47
    EP  - 54
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2330-8540
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajss.20180602.13
    AB  - Objective: This study aimed to compare different methods to determine energy expenditure (EE) on incline walking. Approach: The methods tested were a conventional triaxial accelerometer (GT3X), a versatile system (SenseWear), both utilizing single regression models, and a device equipped with a triaxial accelerometer and an air pressure sensor (move II). Twenty-five healthy participants wore the activity monitors and a portable indirect calorimeter (IC) as reference while walking up- and downhill as well as up- and downstairs. The accuracy of the three devices for estimating EE was assessed based on Pearson correlation, ICC, and Bland–Altman analysis. Main results: For GT3X and SenseWear the ICCs showed a weak correlation (between 0.42 and 0.08) and for move II a strong correlation (between 0.97 and 0.84) between the prediction of energy cost and the output from IC, respectively. Overall, the differences absolute to the IC values were 11 to 35 (12 to 30) times higher for the GT3X (SenseWear) than for the move II devices. Significance: The study showed that a device equipped with an accelerometer and an air pressure sensor had higher accuracy in predicting EE during incline walking than a conventional accelerometer or a versatile system.
    VL  - 6
    IS  - 2
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Department of Physiology and Biochemistry of Nutrition, Max Rubner-Institut, Karlsruhe, Germany; Institute of Sports and Sports Sciences, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany

  • Institute of Sports and Sports Sciences, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany

  • Institute of Sports and Sports Sciences, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany

  • Institute of Sports and Sports Sciences, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany

  • Institute of Sports and Sports Sciences, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany

  • Institute of Sports and Sports Sciences, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany

  • Institute of Sports and Sports Sciences, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany

  • Section