Central African Journal of Public Health

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Influence of Some Demographic Factors on Infection of Schistosomiasis: The Case of Njombe-Penja Population, in the Littoral Region of Cameroon

Received: 25 January 2019    Accepted: 21 March 2019    Published: 26 April 2019
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Abstract

Schistosomiasis remains a major public health problem within Njombe-Penja population since the very first discoveries made in the sixties. Inadequate knowledge on both urinal and intestinal prevalences as well as socio-demographic influences of this infection in the whole area are some of the crucial factors for making faded epidemiological control of the disease. Between September 2014 and May 2015, according to a cross sectional study, 369 participants (172 males and 197 females) were randomly sampled where feces and urine samples were collected. Therefore they were respectively analyzed using the Kato-Katz and centrifugation techniques. Two species of schistosomes Schistosoma mansoni (19.8%) and Schistosoma haematobium (0.3%) with an overall prevalence of 20.1% were recorded. On the other hand, persons aged from 23 years (5.7%; P ≥ 0.05) and females (10.3%; P ≥ 0.05) were more infected. Furthermore, students (14.7%; P ≥ 0.05) and persons with primary school level of education were more infected as quarters crossed by streams such as Mbouale (5.4%; P ≥0.05) and Mouantaba (4.3%; P ≥ 0.05). However, mean parasitic load of intestinal schistosomiasis was 39.8 eggs/g of feces and 01egg/ 10ml of urine for urinary schistosomiasis. This study reveals that, infection prevalence of schistosomiasis as well as parasitic load within Njombe-communities remain relatively high. While in socio-demographic influences, subjects with 23 and above, females, primary level of education, Mbouale and Mouantaba quarters had highest prevalence. Therefore, there is a huge need for integrated control program by treating the whole population.

DOI 10.11648/j.cajph.20190503.13
Published in Central African Journal of Public Health (Volume 5, Issue 3, June 2019)
Page(s) 113-119
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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Demographic Factors, Schistosomiasis, Schistosoma Mansoni, Schistosoma Haematobium, Njombe-Penja

References
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Cite This Article
  • APA Style

    Vincent Khan Payne, Sylvain Tathio, Leonelle Megwi, Ghislain Roméo Ngangnang, Cedric Yamsi, et al. (2019). Influence of Some Demographic Factors on Infection of Schistosomiasis: The Case of Njombe-Penja Population, in the Littoral Region of Cameroon. Central African Journal of Public Health, 5(3), 113-119. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.cajph.20190503.13

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    ACS Style

    Vincent Khan Payne; Sylvain Tathio; Leonelle Megwi; Ghislain Roméo Ngangnang; Cedric Yamsi, et al. Influence of Some Demographic Factors on Infection of Schistosomiasis: The Case of Njombe-Penja Population, in the Littoral Region of Cameroon. Cent. Afr. J. Public Health 2019, 5(3), 113-119. doi: 10.11648/j.cajph.20190503.13

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    AMA Style

    Vincent Khan Payne, Sylvain Tathio, Leonelle Megwi, Ghislain Roméo Ngangnang, Cedric Yamsi, et al. Influence of Some Demographic Factors on Infection of Schistosomiasis: The Case of Njombe-Penja Population, in the Littoral Region of Cameroon. Cent Afr J Public Health. 2019;5(3):113-119. doi: 10.11648/j.cajph.20190503.13

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  • @article{10.11648/j.cajph.20190503.13,
      author = {Vincent Khan Payne and Sylvain Tathio and Leonelle Megwi and Ghislain Roméo Ngangnang and Cedric Yamsi and Cindy José Ouaba Tanefo and Vanessa Rosine Nkouayep},
      title = {Influence of Some Demographic Factors on Infection of Schistosomiasis: The Case of Njombe-Penja Population, in the Littoral Region of Cameroon},
      journal = {Central African Journal of Public Health},
      volume = {5},
      number = {3},
      pages = {113-119},
      doi = {10.11648/j.cajph.20190503.13},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.cajph.20190503.13},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.cajph.20190503.13},
      abstract = {Schistosomiasis remains a major public health problem within Njombe-Penja population since the very first discoveries made in the sixties. Inadequate knowledge on both urinal and intestinal prevalences as well as socio-demographic influences of this infection in the whole area are some of the crucial factors for making faded epidemiological control of the disease. Between September 2014 and May 2015, according to a cross sectional study, 369 participants (172 males and 197 females) were randomly sampled where feces and urine samples were collected. Therefore they were respectively analyzed using the Kato-Katz and centrifugation techniques. Two species of schistosomes Schistosoma mansoni (19.8%) and Schistosoma haematobium (0.3%) with an overall prevalence of 20.1% were recorded. On the other hand, persons aged from 23 years (5.7%; P ≥ 0.05) and females (10.3%; P ≥ 0.05) were more infected. Furthermore, students (14.7%; P ≥ 0.05) and persons with primary school level of education were more infected as quarters crossed by streams such as Mbouale (5.4%; P ≥0.05) and Mouantaba (4.3%; P ≥ 0.05). However, mean parasitic load of intestinal schistosomiasis was 39.8 eggs/g of feces and 01egg/ 10ml of urine for urinary schistosomiasis. This study reveals that, infection prevalence of schistosomiasis as well as parasitic load within Njombe-communities remain relatively high. While in socio-demographic influences, subjects with 23 and above, females, primary level of education, Mbouale and Mouantaba quarters had highest prevalence. Therefore, there is a huge need for integrated control program by treating the whole population.},
     year = {2019}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Influence of Some Demographic Factors on Infection of Schistosomiasis: The Case of Njombe-Penja Population, in the Littoral Region of Cameroon
    AU  - Vincent Khan Payne
    AU  - Sylvain Tathio
    AU  - Leonelle Megwi
    AU  - Ghislain Roméo Ngangnang
    AU  - Cedric Yamsi
    AU  - Cindy José Ouaba Tanefo
    AU  - Vanessa Rosine Nkouayep
    Y1  - 2019/04/26
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    DO  - 10.11648/j.cajph.20190503.13
    T2  - Central African Journal of Public Health
    JF  - Central African Journal of Public Health
    JO  - Central African Journal of Public Health
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    EP  - 119
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2575-5781
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.cajph.20190503.13
    AB  - Schistosomiasis remains a major public health problem within Njombe-Penja population since the very first discoveries made in the sixties. Inadequate knowledge on both urinal and intestinal prevalences as well as socio-demographic influences of this infection in the whole area are some of the crucial factors for making faded epidemiological control of the disease. Between September 2014 and May 2015, according to a cross sectional study, 369 participants (172 males and 197 females) were randomly sampled where feces and urine samples were collected. Therefore they were respectively analyzed using the Kato-Katz and centrifugation techniques. Two species of schistosomes Schistosoma mansoni (19.8%) and Schistosoma haematobium (0.3%) with an overall prevalence of 20.1% were recorded. On the other hand, persons aged from 23 years (5.7%; P ≥ 0.05) and females (10.3%; P ≥ 0.05) were more infected. Furthermore, students (14.7%; P ≥ 0.05) and persons with primary school level of education were more infected as quarters crossed by streams such as Mbouale (5.4%; P ≥0.05) and Mouantaba (4.3%; P ≥ 0.05). However, mean parasitic load of intestinal schistosomiasis was 39.8 eggs/g of feces and 01egg/ 10ml of urine for urinary schistosomiasis. This study reveals that, infection prevalence of schistosomiasis as well as parasitic load within Njombe-communities remain relatively high. While in socio-demographic influences, subjects with 23 and above, females, primary level of education, Mbouale and Mouantaba quarters had highest prevalence. Therefore, there is a huge need for integrated control program by treating the whole population.
    VL  - 5
    IS  - 3
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Department of Animal Biology, Research Unit of Biology and Applied Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon

  • Department of Animal Biology, Research Unit of Biology and Applied Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon

  • Department of Animal Biology, Research Unit of Biology and Applied Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon

  • Department of Animal Biology, Research Unit of Biology and Applied Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon

  • Department of Animal Biology, Research Unit of Biology and Applied Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon

  • Department of Animal Biology, Research Unit of Biology and Applied Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon

  • Department of Animal Biology, Research Unit of Biology and Applied Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon

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