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Review of the Genetic Variability in Maize Genotypes (Zea mays L)

Published in Plant (Volume 10, Issue 1)
Received: 29 November 2021    Accepted: 14 January 2022    Published: 21 January 2022
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Abstract

Maize (Zea mays L.) is the world's third most important cereal crop, with a high yield potential. Most authorities believe that Central America and Mexico, where many different species of maize can be found, are the primary sources of maize. It is one of the world's most important economic crops. Maize is a priority and strategic crop to react to the world's need for alternate energy sources, in addition to its usage as food and feed. It is the staple crop for millions of people in Ethiopia, where it ranks #1 in total output and yield per unit area. The genetic heterogeneity in the existing germplasm is used to select for high yield with desirable features. In order to be successful, breeding programs must have enough genetic variation to allow for selection and improvement. Knowing the extent of genetic variability, heritability, and genetic gains in the selection of desirable traits could aid the plant breeder in determining breeding program requirements. Many researches on genetic variability have been conducted using appropriate biometrical instruments such as variability, heritability, and genetic progress to determine the level of genetic diversity in the population. Genetic advance aids in crop development via selecting for specific features, and heritability is a useful measure for estimating the amount of the genetic portion of overall variability. The purpose of this review study was to evaluate the genetic variability, heritability, and genetic progress of maize genotypes.

Published in Plant (Volume 10, Issue 1)
DOI 10.11648/j.plant.20221001.11
Page(s) 1-7
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Maize, Genetic Variability, Heritability, Genotypes, Correlation

References
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  • APA Style

    Werkissa Yali. (2022). Review of the Genetic Variability in Maize Genotypes (Zea mays L). Plant, 10(1), 1-7. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.plant.20221001.11

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    Werkissa Yali. Review of the Genetic Variability in Maize Genotypes (Zea mays L). Plant. 2022, 10(1), 1-7. doi: 10.11648/j.plant.20221001.11

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    AMA Style

    Werkissa Yali. Review of the Genetic Variability in Maize Genotypes (Zea mays L). Plant. 2022;10(1):1-7. doi: 10.11648/j.plant.20221001.11

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  • @article{10.11648/j.plant.20221001.11,
      author = {Werkissa Yali},
      title = {Review of the Genetic Variability in Maize Genotypes (Zea mays L)},
      journal = {Plant},
      volume = {10},
      number = {1},
      pages = {1-7},
      doi = {10.11648/j.plant.20221001.11},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.plant.20221001.11},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.plant.20221001.11},
      abstract = {Maize (Zea mays L.) is the world's third most important cereal crop, with a high yield potential. Most authorities believe that Central America and Mexico, where many different species of maize can be found, are the primary sources of maize. It is one of the world's most important economic crops. Maize is a priority and strategic crop to react to the world's need for alternate energy sources, in addition to its usage as food and feed. It is the staple crop for millions of people in Ethiopia, where it ranks #1 in total output and yield per unit area. The genetic heterogeneity in the existing germplasm is used to select for high yield with desirable features. In order to be successful, breeding programs must have enough genetic variation to allow for selection and improvement. Knowing the extent of genetic variability, heritability, and genetic gains in the selection of desirable traits could aid the plant breeder in determining breeding program requirements. Many researches on genetic variability have been conducted using appropriate biometrical instruments such as variability, heritability, and genetic progress to determine the level of genetic diversity in the population. Genetic advance aids in crop development via selecting for specific features, and heritability is a useful measure for estimating the amount of the genetic portion of overall variability. The purpose of this review study was to evaluate the genetic variability, heritability, and genetic progress of maize genotypes.},
     year = {2022}
    }
    

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    T2  - Plant
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    AB  - Maize (Zea mays L.) is the world's third most important cereal crop, with a high yield potential. Most authorities believe that Central America and Mexico, where many different species of maize can be found, are the primary sources of maize. It is one of the world's most important economic crops. Maize is a priority and strategic crop to react to the world's need for alternate energy sources, in addition to its usage as food and feed. It is the staple crop for millions of people in Ethiopia, where it ranks #1 in total output and yield per unit area. The genetic heterogeneity in the existing germplasm is used to select for high yield with desirable features. In order to be successful, breeding programs must have enough genetic variation to allow for selection and improvement. Knowing the extent of genetic variability, heritability, and genetic gains in the selection of desirable traits could aid the plant breeder in determining breeding program requirements. Many researches on genetic variability have been conducted using appropriate biometrical instruments such as variability, heritability, and genetic progress to determine the level of genetic diversity in the population. Genetic advance aids in crop development via selecting for specific features, and heritability is a useful measure for estimating the amount of the genetic portion of overall variability. The purpose of this review study was to evaluate the genetic variability, heritability, and genetic progress of maize genotypes.
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Author Information
  • Chiro National Sorghum Research and Training Centre, Chiro, Ethiopia

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