Central African Journal of Public Health

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Randomized Control Trial on the Effect of Health Education on Health Related Quality of Life Among Tuberculosis Patients in Kenya

Received: 14 February 2022    Accepted: 11 March 2022    Published: 23 March 2022
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Abstract

Although health education is incorporated in tuberculosis treatment in Kenya, its role in improving quality of life of the patient is unknown. The main objective of the study was to determine effect of health education on the health related quality of life of tuberculosis patients in Kenya. To achieve this goal the health education program was designed using the PRECEDE-PROCEED model of study. Randomized controlled trial design with pre- and post-test assessments was adopted. The study was conducted between September 2019 and February 2020 in Nairobi and Murang’a Counties. A sample size of 450 patients was calculated with 373 meeting the eligibility criteria. Before introducing health education the patients were assigned into experimental and control groups. Health education was administered to the experimental group but no such intervention was given to the control group. After six months the two groups were compared. A standard questionnaire was used to collect demographic data while data on health related quality of life adopted EQ-5D-5L and EQ-VAS instruments. MANOVA was used to analyze domains of health and scores on the test of perceived poor health. 15% of the changes in the domains of health were accounted for by health education while 39.3% of changes in health scores were attributed to health education. The study concluded that improved knowledge on TB by patients as a result of health education enhanced the health related quality of life. It was recommended that the health education model be adapted in other health facilities providing tuberculosis services in Kenya.

DOI 10.11648/j.cajph.20220802.13
Published in Central African Journal of Public Health (Volume 8, Issue 2, April 2022)
Page(s) 33-46
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Experimental and Control Groups, Health Education Intervention, Health Related Quality of Life, Tuberculosis Patient

References
[1] WHO, (2015). Global Strategy and target for TB Prevention, Care and Control. Available at: https://www.who.int/tb/post2015_strategy. Date Accessed, 15th September 2020.
[2] WHO, (2017). Multidrug resistant TB (MDR-TB) update WHO global TB program. Available at: https://www.who.int/tb/challenges/mdr/MDR-RR_TB_factsheet_2017.pdf. Date Accessed, 18th September 2020.
[3] Bauer M, Ahmed S, Benedetti A. (2015). Health related quality of life and tuberculosis: A longitudinal cohort study. Health related quality outcomes 2015, 13: 65-65.
[4] KNTBS, (2017). The Kenya national tuberculosis survey 2017, Nairobi, Kenya.
[5] Rosebella K. (2018). Evaluation of health and economic burden of diabetes among patients attending Kiambu hospital, Kenya.
[6] Noor H. (2019). Cost-effectiveness of health education in improving treatment outcomes. Department of Community Health Faculty of Medicine and Clinical Sciences, University Putra Malaysia, Selangor Malaysia.
[7] Iqbal MS, Iqbal MZ and Iqbal MW. (2015). Randomized Controlled Intervention trials. Effect of Counseling and Treatment adherence and Self-esteem of women patients receiving TB treatment. Department of psychology, University of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan.
[8] Louw JS. (2016). Change in health related quality of life among pulmonary TB patients at primary health care settings in South Africa.
[9] Adewole O, Ayuk A, Philip A, Adewele T, Alabi O, and Kalawole T. (2018). Health related quality of life. Scores vary with treatment and may identify potential defaulters during treatment of TB 30 (4): 283290dol; 10.4314/mmj.v3014.12pmcid:pmc6863409.
[10] Ian M. (2016). Measuring National wellbeing in UK; office for National Statistics.
[11] Sreenharshike D, Kishore YJ, and Navyak KN. (2016). Awareness about TB and RNTCP services among rural people in Nalgonda district, Telengena, India.
[12] Yan-Yan Liu (2017). Effect of comprehensive nursing intervention in quality of life and prognosis of patients with smear positive TB, School of Medicine of Xuchang University, Xuchang, PR China.
[13] Pornsak K. (2013). Health education program for improving TB Migrants compliance, Mahindok University, Bangkok, Thailand.
[14] MOH, (2018). Kenya national tuberculosis, leprosy and lung disease program, Nairobi, Kenya.
[15] Attia A. (2005). Bias in RCTs: confounders, selection bias and allocation concealment Middle East Fertility Society Journal, Vol. 10: (258-261).
[16] EuroQol Research Foundation (2019). EQ-5D- 5L user guide, EuroQol, https://equroqol.org/publications/user-guides.
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  • APA Style

    Humphrey Mbuti Kimani, Francis Oguya, Peterson Warutere, Elizabeth Mwaniki. (2022). Randomized Control Trial on the Effect of Health Education on Health Related Quality of Life Among Tuberculosis Patients in Kenya. Central African Journal of Public Health, 8(2), 33-46. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.cajph.20220802.13

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    ACS Style

    Humphrey Mbuti Kimani; Francis Oguya; Peterson Warutere; Elizabeth Mwaniki. Randomized Control Trial on the Effect of Health Education on Health Related Quality of Life Among Tuberculosis Patients in Kenya. Cent. Afr. J. Public Health 2022, 8(2), 33-46. doi: 10.11648/j.cajph.20220802.13

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    AMA Style

    Humphrey Mbuti Kimani, Francis Oguya, Peterson Warutere, Elizabeth Mwaniki. Randomized Control Trial on the Effect of Health Education on Health Related Quality of Life Among Tuberculosis Patients in Kenya. Cent Afr J Public Health. 2022;8(2):33-46. doi: 10.11648/j.cajph.20220802.13

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  • @article{10.11648/j.cajph.20220802.13,
      author = {Humphrey Mbuti Kimani and Francis Oguya and Peterson Warutere and Elizabeth Mwaniki},
      title = {Randomized Control Trial on the Effect of Health Education on Health Related Quality of Life Among Tuberculosis Patients in Kenya},
      journal = {Central African Journal of Public Health},
      volume = {8},
      number = {2},
      pages = {33-46},
      doi = {10.11648/j.cajph.20220802.13},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.cajph.20220802.13},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.cajph.20220802.13},
      abstract = {Although health education is incorporated in tuberculosis treatment in Kenya, its role in improving quality of life of the patient is unknown. The main objective of the study was to determine effect of health education on the health related quality of life of tuberculosis patients in Kenya. To achieve this goal the health education program was designed using the PRECEDE-PROCEED model of study. Randomized controlled trial design with pre- and post-test assessments was adopted. The study was conducted between September 2019 and February 2020 in Nairobi and Murang’a Counties. A sample size of 450 patients was calculated with 373 meeting the eligibility criteria. Before introducing health education the patients were assigned into experimental and control groups. Health education was administered to the experimental group but no such intervention was given to the control group. After six months the two groups were compared. A standard questionnaire was used to collect demographic data while data on health related quality of life adopted EQ-5D-5L and EQ-VAS instruments. MANOVA was used to analyze domains of health and scores on the test of perceived poor health. 15% of the changes in the domains of health were accounted for by health education while 39.3% of changes in health scores were attributed to health education. The study concluded that improved knowledge on TB by patients as a result of health education enhanced the health related quality of life. It was recommended that the health education model be adapted in other health facilities providing tuberculosis services in Kenya.},
     year = {2022}
    }
    

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    T1  - Randomized Control Trial on the Effect of Health Education on Health Related Quality of Life Among Tuberculosis Patients in Kenya
    AU  - Humphrey Mbuti Kimani
    AU  - Francis Oguya
    AU  - Peterson Warutere
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    JF  - Central African Journal of Public Health
    JO  - Central African Journal of Public Health
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    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2575-5781
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    AB  - Although health education is incorporated in tuberculosis treatment in Kenya, its role in improving quality of life of the patient is unknown. The main objective of the study was to determine effect of health education on the health related quality of life of tuberculosis patients in Kenya. To achieve this goal the health education program was designed using the PRECEDE-PROCEED model of study. Randomized controlled trial design with pre- and post-test assessments was adopted. The study was conducted between September 2019 and February 2020 in Nairobi and Murang’a Counties. A sample size of 450 patients was calculated with 373 meeting the eligibility criteria. Before introducing health education the patients were assigned into experimental and control groups. Health education was administered to the experimental group but no such intervention was given to the control group. After six months the two groups were compared. A standard questionnaire was used to collect demographic data while data on health related quality of life adopted EQ-5D-5L and EQ-VAS instruments. MANOVA was used to analyze domains of health and scores on the test of perceived poor health. 15% of the changes in the domains of health were accounted for by health education while 39.3% of changes in health scores were attributed to health education. The study concluded that improved knowledge on TB by patients as a result of health education enhanced the health related quality of life. It was recommended that the health education model be adapted in other health facilities providing tuberculosis services in Kenya.
    VL  - 8
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Author Information
  • School of Health Sciences, Technical University of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya

  • School of Health Sciences, Technical University of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya

  • School of Public Health, Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya

  • School of Health Sciences, Technical University of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya

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